Biosociology: An Emerging Paradigm

By Anthony Walsh | Go to book overview

Chapter 3
The Brain and Its Environment

All environmental experiences enter the individual through the brain. In turn, the brain codes, organizes, and responds to such environmental input by way of the motor systems and behavior. Behavior is controlled by the brain, and without an understanding of the brain, we have no way of understanding behavior.

--C. Jeffery

The human brain--a walnut-shaped, grapefruit-sized, three-pound mass of gelatinous tissue--is the most immensely complicated, awe-inspiring, and fascinating entity in the universe. "In the human head there are forces within forces within forces, as in no other cubic half-foot of the universe we know," wrote Nobel Prize--winning neurophysiologist Roger Sperry (quoted in Fincher, 1982:23). Within this blob of jelly--which consumes 20 percent of the body's energy while representing only 2 percent of body mass--lie our thoughts, memories, self-concepts, desires, emotions, loves, hates, intelligence, creativity, and the contents of our cultures.

As the executor of all that we do and think, the brain and its processes must be a vital part of the biosociologist's repertoire of knowledge. We can no longer afford to view the brain as a mysterious and foreboding "black box" that can be safely ignored as irrelevant to our work. Although we need not concern ourselves with the minutiae of brain anatomy and physiology any more than with the minutiae of molecular genetics, we should learn neuroscience's basic language so that we understand what they are talking about. In anticipation of major advances in the neurosciences, the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) spearheaded the effort, which culminated in President George Bush declaring the 1990s as "the Decade of the Brain"

-43-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Biosociology: An Emerging Paradigm
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 276

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.