Playing the Game: The Presidential Rhetoric of Ronald Reagan

By Mary E. Stuckey | Go to book overview

This was true during the Reagan administration. Given a climate personally favorable to him and antagonistic to the media, Reagan was quick to seize the advantage and act to curtail the access and legitimacy of the White House media corps. This does not mean that the media are innocent bystanders or the protectors of democracy and should be rescued from the infamous Reagan administration. The question of the proper role of the media in our national politics is a complex subject and deserves more attention than I have given it here. What this study has shown is that through his public rhetoric as well as through organizational and legal means, Reagan has positioned himself in such a way as to discredit his opposition and the media.

Rhetoric does not control events; it serves to interpret them. Through a combination of organizational techniques and rhetorical positioning, Reagan helped to structure situations so that his interpretation, already in a favorable position, would be paramount. The nature of that interpretation, as well as further extrapolation of Reagan's rhetorical tactics and techniques, provide the substance of the following three chapters.


NOTES

Part of this Chapter was originally presented at the Annual Meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association, Chicago, Ill., April 1988.

1.
As quoted by Martin Linsky, Impact: How the Press Affects Federal Policymaking ( New York: W. W. Norton, 1986), p. 17.
2.
Linsky, Impact, p. 3.
3.
David Morgan, The Capital Press Corps: Newsmen and the Governing of New York State (Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1978), p. 148.
4.
William L. Rivers, The Other Government: Power and the Washington Media ( New York: Universe Books, 1982), p. 10.
5.
George F. Will, "Introduction," in Press, Politics, and Popular Government, ed. George F. Will ( Washington, D.C.: The American Enterprise Institute, 1972), p. 2.
6.
Robert L. Bartley, "The Press: Adversary, Surrogate Sovereign, or Both?," in Press, Politics, and Popular Government, ed. George F. Will ( Washington, D.C.: The American Enterprise Institute, 1972), p. 7.
7.
John Tebbel and Sarah Miles Watts, The Press and the Presidency: From George Washington to Ronald Reagan ( New York, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1985), p. 549.

-23-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Playing the Game: The Presidential Rhetoric of Ronald Reagan
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • PRAEGER SERIES IN POLITICAL COMMUNICATION ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Series Foreword xi
  • Notes xiii
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 6
  • Chapter 1 Ronald Reagan and the National Media 9
  • Introduction 9
  • Notes 22
  • Notes 23
  • Chapter 2 Revolution: Reagan's First Years, 1981-1982 27
  • CONCLUSIONS 41
  • Notes 41
  • Chapter 3 Consolidation: the Teflon President, 1983-1985 47
  • Introduction 47
  • CONCLUSIONS 61
  • Notes 62
  • Chapter 4 Cracks in the Teflon, 1986-1988 67
  • Introduction 67
  • CONCLUSIONS 80
  • Notes 81
  • Chapter 5 the Great Communicator? 85
  • Introduction 85
  • Notes 93
  • Epilogue: Rhetoric in the Post-Reagan Era 95
  • INTRODUCRION 95
  • Notes 114
  • Notes 115
  • Selected Bibliography 119
  • Index 125
  • About the Author 128
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 130

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.