Arms Control and European Security

By Graeme P. Auton | Go to book overview
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NOTES
1.
See Steve Smith, "U.S.-Soviet Strategic Nuclear Arms Control: From SALT to START to Stop," Arms Control 5 ( 1984): pp. 50-74. For discussions of START, see Strobe Talbott, Deadly Gambits: The Reagan Administration and the Stalemate in Arms Control ( New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1984), Part Two; Christopher Paine, "A False START," Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists 38, no. 7 ( 1982): pp. 11-14; Christopher Paine, "Breakdown on the Build-Down," Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists 39, no. 2 ( 1983): pp. 4-7; and Jan Lodal, "Finishing START," Foreign Policy 48 ( 1982): pp. 66-81.
2.
See Aviation Week & Space Technology, 14 October 1985, p. 21.
3.
See Arms Control Today 16, no. 1 ( 1986): p. 13. (Hereafter cited as ACT.)
4.
Ibid., p. 14.
5.
See ACT 16, no. 4 ( 1986): pp. 15-16.
6.
See ACT 16, no. 5 ( 1986): p. 16.
7.
See ACT 16, no. 6 ( 1986): p. 23.
8.
See ACT 16, no. 7 ( 1986): pp. 21-22.
9.
See ACT 15, no. 7 ( 1985): p. 13.
10.
See ACT 16, no. 4 ( 1986): pp. 13-14.
11.
See ACT 16, no. 8 ( 1986): pp. 9-11.
12.
See ACT 16, no. 10 ( 1986): pp. 18-19.
13.
See ACT 17, no. 7 ( 1987): p. 31.
14.
See ACT 17, no. 8 ( 1987): pp. 22-24.
15.
See Michele Flournoy, "A Rocky START on the Path to Reductions," ACT 17, no. 8 ( 1987): pp. 7-9, 12-13.
16.
See ACT 17, no. 8 ( 1987): pp. 22-24.
17.
Ibid. pp. 18-19.
18.
ACT 18, no. 1 ( 1988): pp. 21-22.
19.
This reflected a compromise between the U.S. proposal that the limit be 4,800 ballistic missile warheads (coupled with 1,200 ALCMs) and the Soviet de facto limit of 5,100, derived from their October 1987 proposal to set a maximum of 900 ALCMs within the 6,000 warhead ceiling.
20.
ACT 18, no. 1 ( 1988): p. 22.
21.
ACT 18, no. 2 ( 1988): p. 22.
22.
See International Herald Tribune, 26-27 March 1988, p. 1.
23.
See ACT 18, no. 4 ( 1988): pp. 19, 27.
24.
See International Herald Tribune, 27 May 1988, p. 3.
25.
Ibid., 2 June 1988, pp. 1-2.
26.
See Michael Mecham, "Reagan, Congress Compromise on SDI; $300 Billion Defense Bill to Be Signed," Aviation Week & Space Technology, 3 October 1988, pp. 20-21. The 1989 SDI authorization included $3.73 billion for the Defense Department, $262 million for the Energy Department's nuclear programs, and $83 million for military construction.
27.
For examples of SDI debate, see Steve Smith, "SDI and the New Cold War," in Richard Crockatt and Steve Smith, eds., The Cold War Past and Present ( London: Allen and Unwin, 1987), pp. 149-70; Office of Technology Assessment, Strategic Defenses ( Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1986); Office of

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