Learning Limits: College Women, Drugs, and Relationships

By Kimberly M. Williams | Go to book overview

Chapter 3
Drug Use and Separating from Friends

Sometimes women changed their thoughts about drugs or their own personal drug use. Differences in drug use or attitudes about drug use often resulted in a separation from friends. This separation was difficult, and often began with harsh criticism and judgments of a friend's drug use or her behavior when she used drugs.


CRITICIZING, PREACHING, AND JUDGING FEMALE PEERS

Many of the women judged how their female friends acted in particular drug- using or drinking situations. When a woman was sober in instances when her female friends were drinking, she tended to become particularly judgmental and critical of her drinking friends, particularly when she described how her drinking female friends interacted with men. If a woman was "out of control," she was sometimes judged very harshly by women who were in control at the time, as well as by women who were usually in control (i.e., infrequent or nonusers) using morality-laden discourses loaded with dichotomies such as good or bad, right or wrong. Some of the women were critical even when they knew that occasionally they might act exactly like the other women they were condemning. Sometimes, if situations where a woman was highly critical of a friend happened frequently, the woman would choose to separate from this female friend.

Light users or nonusers were often the most severe moral judges of "out-of- control" drug use among their female friends, perhaps because they claimed always to be "in control." This criticism may have been made in part because they resented being placed in the caretaking role so often. Gilly was a self-reported nonuser, and her feelings of pride were evident throughout her journal entries and her moral judgments of other women's use. For her, as well as for many of the other light users or nonusers, loss of control seemed to be what separated problem users from infrequent users and nonusers. She wrote: "I think it's pretty scary to

-45-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Learning Limits: College Women, Drugs, and Relationships
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 194

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.