The Environmental Crisis

By Miguel A. Santos; Randall M. Miller | Go to book overview

mental conservation and economic activities are substantially intertwined; and that without global collaboration a healthy, sustainable biosphere is not possible.

Looking back on the historical development of the environmental movement during the twentieth century, it is apparent that the world has partially shifted itself in a new direction. That is not to say that a Chernobyl-like accident could never reoccur, that people will never be exposed to a cancercausing substance, that no species of wildlife will ever become extinct, that any natural environment will never be exploited, or that global climate change will not occur. There is a great deal of work yet to be done on these and many other environmental concerns. As the needs and goals of the global community change in the twenty-first century, new environmental issues no doubt will emerge to be reckoned with, and new environmentalists and organizations will arise to meet those challenges.


NOTES
1.
Norman J. Vig and Michael E. Kraft, Environmental Policy in the 1990s ( Washington, DC: Congressional Quarterly, 1994), 73.
2.
Samuel P. Hays, Beauty, Health, and Permanence: Environmental Politics in the United States, 1955-1985 ( New York: Cambridge University Press, 1987), 5.
3.
City of Philadelphia v. New Jersey, 437 US 617, p. 628 ( 1978).
4.
Duke Power v. Carolina Environmental Study Group, Inc., 438 US 59 ( 1978).
5.
Missouri v. Holland, 252 US 416 ( 1920).
6.
Jacqueline V. Switzer, Environmental Politics: Domestic and Global Dimensions ( New York: St. Martin's Press, 1994), 14.
7.
Charles H. Southwick, "Environmental Impacts of Early Societies and the Rise of Agriculture," in C. H. Southwick, ed., Global Ecology ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1996), 209.
8.
1989 G7 Paris Economic Summit, Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents ( July 16, 1989), 1105.
9.
Robert W. Hahn and Kenneth Richards, "The Internationalization of Environmental Regulation," Harvard Journal of International Law 30 ( 1989): 421-46.
10.
Richard Sandbrook, "Towards a Global Environmental Strategy," in C. C. Clark , ed., Environmental Policies ( Dover, NH: Croom Helm, 1986), 302.

-24-

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