The Early Years of the Saturday Club, 1855-1870

By Edward Waldo Emerson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV
1857

Go, bid the broad Atlantic scroll Be herald of the free.1

Once again the pine-tree sung: -- 'Speak not thy speech my boughs among; Put off thy years, wash in the breeze; My hours are peaceful centuries.'

EMERSON, Woodnotes

THIS year was remembered with pride and pleasure by the early members because, first, of an event important in the literary history of America in which many of them were concerned and all interested; and, second, of a delightful enterprise, in which many joined. These were the launching of the Atlantic Monthly, and the founding of the Adirondack Club.

The story of the earnest purpose of Mr. Underwood to found this magazine, and the credit due to him in awakening the interest of Mr. Phillips, the publisher, has been told. Of the membership during the Saturday Club's first twenty years about half were contributors to the Atlantic, and many living members have written for it. In the days of its greatest brilliancy it had a hard struggle to float; now, after sixty years of good repute, it enjoys an assured prosperity.

When, in April of this year, Lowell consented to be the Editor, by happy inspiration making it a condition that Holmes should contribute, the wish, long felt, for a magazine worthy of New England was assured of fulfilment. He asked the same favour of Longfellow, who, only promising to write for this magazine, if

____________________
1
In excuse of this perversion of the word Atlantic from its significance in Emerson's Fourth of July Ode in 1857, the Editor may plead; first, that the new magazine soon won its way abroad, and, second, that one of the main purposes of its founding was that it should be an organ of Freedom.

-128-

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The Early Years of the Saturday Club, 1855-1870
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Introductory xi
  • Chapter I - The Attraction 1
  • Chapter II - 1855-1856 The Saturday Club is Born Also the Magazine or Atlantic Club 11
  • Chapter III - 1856 21
  • Chapter IV - 1857 128
  • Chapter V - 1858 166
  • Chapter VI - 1859 197
  • Chapter VII - 1860 234
  • Chapter VIII - 1861 249
  • Chapter IX - 1862 287
  • Chapter X - 1863 309
  • Chapter XI - 1864 334
  • Chapter XII - 1865 392
  • Chapter XIII - 1866 407
  • Chapter XIV - 1867 428
  • Chapter XV - 1868 447
  • Chapter XVI - 1869 456
  • Chapter XVII - 1870 474
  • Index 503
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