The Environmental Crisis

By Miguel A. Santos; Randall M. Miller | Go to book overview

humankind. Accordingly, bringing together these three "E's" is the ultimate holism and the great challenge for our future. 11

There are over 150 publications among Odum's major accomplishments, which include the following: past president of the Ecological Society of America ( 1964-65), Institute de la Vie Prize ( 1975) awarded by the French Government, Tyler Ecology Award presented by President Carter ( 1977), and the Crawfoord Prize of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences ( 1987). Presently, he is Calloway Professor Emeritus of Ecology at the University of Georgia.


Gifford Pinchot (1865-1946)

Gifford Pinchot was one of the magisterial figures in the field of conservation. As a friend of President Theodore Roosevelt and an astute politician, Pinchot became a catalyst and publicist of the anthropocentric ethics that underlie much of the twentieth century environmental policies. Pinchot was born on August 11, 1865, to an affluent family in Simsbury, Connecticut. He spent his boyhood years with his family in Connecticut and New York City. Endowed with imagination and love of nature, he shared his money, possessions, and intellect to further the cause of his utilitarian philosophy. After graduating from Yale University, he left for Europe to study forestry, because no such training existed in the United States.

Many of his anthropocentric ethics were developed during his European experience, as he began to realize that the most efficient means of exploiting the nation's forests was to develop them through careful government planning rather than private supervision. He combined his scientific skills and intellectual leadership to succeed in becoming head of the Division of Forestry in 1898. In 1905 Pinchot successfully got all the national forests transferred to his agency, by then called the U.S. Forest Service. He served as Chief Forester under Presidents William McKinley, Theodore Roosevelt, and William Taft, though he fell out of favor with Taft in disagreements on how best to set aside and manage natural resources in the federal trust. In addition to promoting conservation measures, Pinchot was governor of Pennsylvania from 1923 to 1927 and from 1931 to 1935. He died on October 4, 1946.


NOTES
1.
Kenneth E. Boulding, "The Economics of the Coming Spaceship Earth" in Henry Jarret, ed., The Economics of the Coming Spaceship Earth ( Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1966).

-165-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Environmental Crisis
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Other Titles in the Greenwood Press Guides to Historic Events of the Twentieth Century ii
  • Title Page iii
  • ADVISORY BOARD v
  • Contents vii
  • Series Foreword ix
  • Preface xiii
  • Chronology of Events xvi
  • Chronology of Events xvii
  • The Environmental Crisis Explained 1
  • Notes 24
  • 2 - The Concern for Our Vanishing Wilderness 25
  • 3 - Pollution and the Emergence of Environmentalism 57
  • Notes 86
  • 4 - The Environmental Concern for Overpopulation 89
  • Notes 127
  • 5 - The Concept of a Self-Sustainable System 129
  • Notes 153
  • Biographies: The Personalities Behind the Environmental Crisis 155
  • Notes 165
  • Primary Documents of the Environmental Crisis 167
  • Glossary of Selected Terms 225
  • Annotated Bibliography 235
  • Index 245
  • About the Author 251
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 254

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.