Cultures of Curriculum

By Pamela Bolotin Joseph; Stephanie Luster Bravmann et al. | Go to book overview

not have import with regard to the larger issues of curriculum. There is, for example, no social vision promoted by this culture--therefore there is no concern for caring about others or for the environment, for combating oppression, or for making the world a better place. There are no incentives for learners in this culture to participate in the community or in the larger culture outside of school. Learners are given the intellectual tools to think effectively and autonomously, but there are no sustaining moral or social visions that members carry with them from this classroom culture. Constructivism also pays little attention to how politics and privilege affect meaning-making by learners; its pedagogy would clearly be richer and more transformative if students were compelled to consider the influences of race, class, and gender as they "construct" their own images of history, science, and literature ( Rivera & Poplin, 1995).

Developing autonomous learners--who believe in their own powers as creators of knowledge--is a start for creating a society in which authority is never blindly followed and individuals' worldviews are not controlled by miseducative influences of peers and popular culture. Autonomy, however, does not automatically translate into community or a shared vision of a better society. In truth, the constructivist culture may be a means, but not an end.


REFERENCES

Airasian P., & Walsh M. ( 1997). "Constructivist cautions". Phi Delta Kappan, 78( 6), 444- 449.

Brown J. S., Collins A., & Duguid P. ( 1989). "Situated cognition and the culture of learning". Educational Researcher, 18, 32-42.

Bruner J. ( 1996). The culture of education. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Cobb P. ( 1994). "Where is the mind? Constructivist and sociocultural perspectives on mathematical development". Educational Researcher, 23(7), 13-20.

Cobb P., & Yackel E. ( 1996). "Constructivist, emergent, and sociocultural perspectives in the context of developmental research". Educational Psychologist 31 ( 3-4).

Cole M. ( 1991). "Conclusion". In L. B. Resnick, J. M. Levine, & S. D. Teasley (Eds.), Perspectives on socially shared cognition (pp. 398-417). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Cremin L. A. ( 1961/ 1964). The transformation of the school: Progressivism in American education. New York: Vintage.

Dewey J. ( 1916). Democracy and education. New York: Macmillan.

Dewey J. ( 1972). "The university school". In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), The Early Works of John Dewey (p. 437). Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press.

Driver R. ( 1981). "Pupils' alternative frameworks in science". European Journal of Science Education, 3( 1), 93-101.

Driver R., & Easley J. ( 1978). "Pupils and paradigms: A review of literature related to concept development in adolescent science students". Studies in Science Education, 5, 61-84.

Duckworth E. ( 1978). "The African primary science program: An evaluation and extended thoughts". Grand Forks: North Dakota Study Group on Evaluation.

Duckworth E. ( 1986). "Inventing density". Grand Forks: North Dakota Study Group on Evaluation.

Duckworth E. ( 1996). The having of wonderful ideas and other essays on teaching and learning. New York: Teachers College Press.

-113-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cultures of Curriculum
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 194

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.