The Early Years of the Saturday Club, 1855-1870

By Edward Waldo Emerson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XII
1865

Bow down, dear Land, for thou hast found release!
Thy God, in these distempered days,
Hath taught thee the sure wisdom of His ways,
And though thine enemies hath wrought thy peace!
Bow down in prayer and praise.

LOWELL

IN the beginning of the year, Mr. Fessenden, President Lincoln's Secretary of the Treasury, having been renominated for the Senate, was about to withdraw from the Cabinet, where his services had been found invaluable at a time of great financial strain for the Country. Mr. Forbes, writing to him, said, -- "Where shall we look for a man big enough to fill your place? . . . Governor Andrew is going out of office here after this year, and can go without great damage to our State affairs any time on sixty days' notice. He ought to be in the Cabinet, and while, for his own sake, his friends would like to see him in some other place less arduous and less dangerous, he is, in my judgment, the next best man after you for the place. I have summered and wintered him for five years of war and trouble, and while he represents the most advanced opinions on politics, I know no man who so fully unites tact and judgment with perseverance and force."

The Governor, however, declined to be a candidate for this portfolio. He wrote to his friend: "For myself, I should dread to undertake any place but that of Attorney-General. My legal training and tastes would help me to master its duties, while the functions and opportunities for usefulness in that office are such as peculiarly tempt me to risk a failure for the chance of doing good, according to my way of thinking, which it affords." This office, however, was not offered to him.

At the seat of war in Virginia, General Sheridan, summoned by General Grant, yet allowed a very free hand, started with his

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The Early Years of the Saturday Club, 1855-1870
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Introductory xi
  • Chapter I - The Attraction 1
  • Chapter II - 1855-1856 The Saturday Club is Born Also the Magazine or Atlantic Club 11
  • Chapter III - 1856 21
  • Chapter IV - 1857 128
  • Chapter V - 1858 166
  • Chapter VI - 1859 197
  • Chapter VII - 1860 234
  • Chapter VIII - 1861 249
  • Chapter IX - 1862 287
  • Chapter X - 1863 309
  • Chapter XI - 1864 334
  • Chapter XII - 1865 392
  • Chapter XIII - 1866 407
  • Chapter XIV - 1867 428
  • Chapter XV - 1868 447
  • Chapter XVI - 1869 456
  • Chapter XVII - 1870 474
  • Index 503
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