The Early Years of the Saturday Club, 1855-1870

By Edward Waldo Emerson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XVI
1869

How happy is he born and taught That serveth not another's will; Whose armour is his honest thought, And simple truth his utmost skill;

Who envies none that chance doth raise, Or vice; who never understood How deepest wounds are given by praise; Nor rules of State, but rules of good.1

SIR HENRY WOTTON

THE New Year came in cheerfully because of the confidence of the country at large in the strength, common sense, and humanity of their great General. The Club had reason to be gratified in his appointments of Motley as Minister to the Court of St. James, and Judge Hoar in the Cabinet as Attorney-General.

As a result, April would find two empty chairs at " Parker's," besides those of Longfellow and Norton. The former, after a happy residence during the winter on the Lung' Arno in Florence, and on the site of Sallust's villa in Rome, moved his family south- ward in spring to a villa in beautiful Sorrento. Norton, though he had made an excursion with Ruskin into northern France, had been mainly in England rejoicing in the meeting of interesting persons, Carlyle, the Leweses, John Stuart Mill, Burne-Jones, and William Morris. Fields and his wife sailed for Europe in the spring, having won the favour from Lowell of taking his only daughter with them on their excursion. Lowell thanks Fields "for leaving a most delicate loophole for my pride in conferring on me a kind of militia generalship of the Atlantic Monthly while you were away" and offers to make it something real by reading proofs, preventing ---- from writing such awful English, and acting at need as consulting physician.

____________________
1
The direct and honourable conduct of Motley suggests the motto.

-456-

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The Early Years of the Saturday Club, 1855-1870
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Introductory xi
  • Chapter I - The Attraction 1
  • Chapter II - 1855-1856 The Saturday Club is Born Also the Magazine or Atlantic Club 11
  • Chapter III - 1856 21
  • Chapter IV - 1857 128
  • Chapter V - 1858 166
  • Chapter VI - 1859 197
  • Chapter VII - 1860 234
  • Chapter VIII - 1861 249
  • Chapter IX - 1862 287
  • Chapter X - 1863 309
  • Chapter XI - 1864 334
  • Chapter XII - 1865 392
  • Chapter XIII - 1866 407
  • Chapter XIV - 1867 428
  • Chapter XV - 1868 447
  • Chapter XVI - 1869 456
  • Chapter XVII - 1870 474
  • Index 503
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