Teaching Communication: Theory, Research, and Methods

By Anita L. Vangelisti; John A. Daly et al. | Go to book overview

Teaching Communication: Theory, Research, and Methods Second Edition

Edited by

Anita L. Vangelisti John A. Daly University of Texas at Austin and Gustav W. Friedrich Rutgers University

LAWRENCE ERLBAUM ASSOCIATES, PUBLISHERS 1999 Mahwah, New Jersey London

-iii-

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Teaching Communication: Theory, Research, and Methods
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction xi
  • I Thinking About the Goals of Communication Education 1
  • 1: The Communication Discipline 3
  • References 13
  • 2: The Goals of Communication Education 15
  • 3: An Ecological Perspective on College/University Teaching: The Teaching/ Learning Environment and Socialization 31
  • References 45
  • 4: Becoming a Professional 49
  • References 60
  • 5: Creating a New Course 61
  • II Preparing Specific Communication Courses 73
  • 6: Teaching Public Speaking 75
  • 7: Teaching Interpersonal Communication 85
  • References 98
  • CONCLUDING THOUGHTS: GRADING AND CONFRONTING THE BIAS AGAINST GROUP WORK 109
  • References 111
  • 9: Teaching Rhetorical Studies 115
  • References 127
  • 10: Teaching Persuasion 131
  • 11: Teaching Organizational Communication 141
  • References 154
  • Conclusion 168
  • References 169
  • 13: Teaching Intercultural Communication 171
  • References 179
  • 14: Teaching Interviewing 181
  • References 192
  • 15: Teaching Mass Communication and Telecommunication 195
  • References 206
  • 16: Teaching Research Methods 209
  • 17: Teaching a Special Topic Course 223
  • References 239
  • III Organizing the Instructional Context 241
  • 18: Classroom Roles of the Teacher 243
  • 19: Diversity in Classroom Dynamics 257
  • References 268
  • 20: Classroom Management: Contending With College Student Discipline 269
  • References 283
  • 21: The First Day 287
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENT 295
  • REFFERENCES 295
  • IV Selecting and Evaluating Instructional Strategies and Tools 297
  • 22: Selected Tools and Methods to Engage Students in Learning 299
  • References 316
  • 23: Explanatory Skills 319
  • References 329
  • 24: Lecturing 333
  • References 345
  • 25: Large Lecture Classes 347
  • 26: Interaction Skills in Instructional Settings 359
  • References 373
  • 27: Individualized Approaches to Instruction 375
  • References 389
  • 28: Instruction by Design: Technology in the Discourse of Teaching and Learning 393
  • References 408
  • 29: Evaluating the Process 409
  • 30: Evaluating the Product 425
  • V Tackling Some Unique Teaching Assignments 445
  • 31: Directing Multiple Sections of the Basic Course 447
  • References 457
  • 32: Directing Debate and Forensics 459
  • References 469
  • 33: Communication in the 2-Year College 471
  • References 479
  • 34: Distance Education 481
  • 35: Extended Learning 497
  • 36: Consulting 507
  • VI Exploring Important Professional Issues 517
  • 37: Ethical Issues In Teaching 519
  • References 530
  • 38: Fitting Into the Department and the Profession 531
  • Author Index 543
  • Subject Index 555
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