The Third Electoral System 1853-1892: Parties, Voters, and Political Cultures

By Paul Kleppner | Go to book overview
Save to active project

7
The Politics of Political Pluralism: Minor Parties and the Third Electoral System

American conditions involve very great and peculiar difficulties for a steady development of a workers' party.... [I]mmigration...divides the workers into two groups: the native-born and the foreigners, and the latter in turn into (1) the Irish, (2) the Germans, (3) the many small groups, each of which understands only itself: Czechs, Poles, Italians, Scandinavians, etc. And then the Negroes. To form a single party out of these requires quite unusually powerful incentives.

Friedrich Engels ( 1893)

That time has come when party fealty must be a matter of secondary importance. The liquor traffic is dominant,...therefore, we must reconstruct our party affiliations. A vote cast for a party today does not mean the same as it did twenty years ago. In this matter we must heed the Divine command: "Come out from among them, and be ye separate, saith the Lord."

Minutes of the New Jersey Annual Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 1892

Although Engels and New Jersey's Methodist ministers had little else in common, each perceptively itemized a behavioral barrier to minor-party voting. As Engels saw it, in the absence of "quite unusually powerful incentives," ethnocultural antagonisms inhibited the development of a transethnic workers' party. The Methodist ministers pointed unmistakably to a recognition of party identification as a powerful constraint on minor-party support.

In fact, these separate obstacles were interrelated, for ethnic and religious conflict had shaped the lines of partisan combat and antagonistic political subcultures had generated party oppositions. Among most social groups partisanship had become inextricably connected with sub

-238-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Third Electoral System 1853-1892: Parties, Voters, and Political Cultures
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 428

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?