The Third Electoral System 1853-1892: Parties, Voters, and Political Cultures

By Paul Kleppner | Go to book overview

8
The Politics of Righteousness: Political Dynamics of the Third Electoral System

Iowa will go Democratic when hell goes Methodist.

Jonathan P. Dolliver ( 1883)

It is safe to assume that the Methodists never polled a majority among Satan's minions, but the Democrats captured a plurality of Iowa's vote in 1889. When Iowa fell to the Democracy, it was part of a large voter shift that extended eastward to the Atlantic. However, geographically separate streams of behavioral forces convulsed the electoral universe in the early 1890s. While the third party system's cleavage lines were being repaired and sharpened in Iowa and eastward, the unmistakable symptoms of systemic breakup were visible to the west. This admixture of reinstatement and disintegration underlay the large partisan shifts in mass political behavior between 1888 and 1892.


The Democratic Surge

The tight partisan balance that had typified most of the stable phase of the third party system gave way in 1890 to a surging Democratic majority. The Democrats polled 51.9 percent of the total vote cast, elected 70.7 percent of the members of the Fifty-second House. won nine of fifteen nonsouthern gubernatorial races, and gained percentage strength (compared with 1888) in twenty-one of the twenty-six states beyond the Confederacy.1 Both the size and amplitude of the Democratic victory were impressive (see Table 8.1).

____________________
1
The Democrats lost strength only in Delaware, California, Kansas, Minnesota, and Nebraska, and in the latter three states both major parties lost strength. The Democ
chap8.1
racy also gained in ten of the eleven ex-Confederate states, losing percentage strength only in South Carolina. This description and the data in Table 8.1 exclude the six states that had not been admitted until after 1888: North and South Dakota, Idaho, Montana, Washington, and Wyoming.

-298-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Third Electoral System 1853-1892: Parties, Voters, and Political Cultures
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 428

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.