Excelsior: Journals of the Hutchinson Family Singers, 1842-1846

By Dale Cockrell | Go to book overview

Appendix A:
History and Description of Manuscript

This edition joins two journals, the first transcribed here as Parts I and II, the remaining parts comprising the second. Both ended up in Minnesota, undoubtedly because Asa, the brother who moved west, was the primary journal-keeper.

The earliest manuscript was dearly cherished as an important family heirloom. Ludlow Patton valued it enough to make a handwritten transcription around 1900, which can now be found in the scrapbook he prepared and deposited in the Wadleigh Public Library, Milford, New Hampshire. It has not been possible to determine how Patton saw the manuscript. Was it loaned to him? Or did he travel to Minnesota to do the transcription, where Asa's son, Oliver Dennett, kept the book among other family papers? Interestingly, his work is incomplete, containing only about forty percent of the full text. Not surprisingly, all the sections concerning his wife Abby are transcribed, but beyond that he generally chose to include descriptions of places and people and omit sections having to do with money matters, intra-family backbiting, Judson's ramblings, and musical matters--often precisely those sections of most interest today.

After Patton's work, the journal laid unused until the 1940s, when a microfilm of Dennett's collection was made for the Minnesota Historical Society, perhaps in response to renewed interest in the Hutchinson Family generated by Carol Brink's and Philip Jordan's books. In fact, at one time the manuscript was given to the Historical Society, to gather from the stamp on the inside of the back cover. But in the days before their current policies regarding gifts, donations were sometimes re-considered and taken back, which seems the case here.

Whatever the situation then, the manuscript today is in the

-385-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Excelsior: Journals of the Hutchinson Family Singers, 1842-1846
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 472

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.