Constitutional Development in Alabama, 1798-1901: A Study in Politics, the Negro, and Sectionalism

By Malcolm Cook McMillan | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHY

BIBLIOGRAPICAL NOTE
This study is based primarily on the journals and other printed records of Alabama's constitutional conventions, newspapers, state and federal documents, and contemporary speeches, articles, books, and pamphlets. Manuscript material has been used, but unfortunately the writer found few letters of the five hundred and ninety-nine delegates in Alabama's six constitutional conventions available. Manuscript minutes of some Democratic party meetings proved very valuable.
A. PRIMARY SOURCES

I. MANUSCRIPTS
John Campbell Papers, Duke University Library.
Clement C. Clay Papers, Duke University Library.
Thomas Goode Jones Papers, Alabama State Department of Archives and History.
Robert McKee Papers, Alabama State Department of Archives and History.
Edward A. O'Neal Papers, Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina.
J. W. A. Sanford Papers, Alabama State Department of Archives and History.
John W. Walker Papers, Alabama State Department of Archives and History.
Journal of the Convention of the People of Alabama begun in Montgomery, January 7, 1861, Alabama State Department of Archives and History.
Minutes of the Democratic State Executive Committee, April 3, September 3, 1901, A labama State Department of Archives and History.
Minutes of the Democratic State Convention, March 29, 1899, Alabama State Department of Archives and History.
Minutes of the Democratic State Convention, March 19, September 3, 1901, September 7, 1906, May 16, 1910, Alabama State Department of Archives and History.
Mississippi Transcripts. Transcripts made by Dr. Thomas M. Owen from the Original Records of the Mississippi Territory. Mississippi Departmeat of Archives and History.
Original Manuscript Returns on the Ratification of the Constitution of 1868. Alabama State Department of Archives and History.
Original Returns of the Vote on Amendments to the Constitution Submitted August, 1859. Alabama State Department of Archives and History.

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