Constitutional Development in Alabama, 1798-1901: A Study in Politics, the Negro, and Sectionalism

By Malcolm Cook McMillan | Go to book overview

INDEX
Abercrombie, John W., and a new constitution for education, 240, 242; a modern era of public education in Alabama, 240n; a district tax for education, 324; supports 1901 Constitution, 348
Address to people, against 1868 Constitution, 155-156, 178; on Constitution of 1875, 211
Admission Bill ( 1868), "Pig Iron" Kelley works for, 172; Stevens bill for, 172-173; Republicans favor, 174; Johnson's veto of, 174
Afro-American Exodus Union, 303
Agrarians, and 1875 convention, 175, 190n; favor repudiation of Reconstruction debt, 203-204, 205n; dominate convention of 1875, 209-210; oppose state aid for industry, 236
Agriculture, restrictions harmful to ( 1875), 209; commissioner of, created ( 1883), 209
Agricultural and Mechanical College, interest of Noah B. Cloud in, 148n; board, of trustees for ( 1875), 207n; analyzes fertilizer, 209n Alabama, Washington County created in, 6; name of state ( 1819), 35 and n; summary of six constitutions, 360- 370
Alabama Baptist, supports 1901 Constitution,
Alabama Commercial and Industrial Association, works for the Constitution of 1901, 233n; and education, 239-240
Alabama Education Association, and local taxation for schools, 237-238, 239n, 324 and n
Alabama Enabling Act, written and sponsored by Charles Tait, 27; provisions of, 28-29 and notes; suffrage under, 30; power of Congress to place limitations in, 43-44
Alabama platform ( 1848), and William L. Yancey, 79
Alabama Policy Conference, and vote on 1901 Constitution, 350-351 and n
Alabama Polytechnic Institute, and convention of 1901, 327. See Agricutural and Mechanical College
Alabama Supreme Court, and usury law, 47-48; trial of judges of, 48-49; ruling on interim appointment of state treasurer and comptroller, 74; county tax limits, 236n; local taxation for education, 237-238; local legislation, 240; advocated changes in, 246; Birmingham Amendment, 248n; and registration of a Negro under soldiers clause, 356n
Alabama Territory, suffrage in, 14; act of organization, 23-24; capital of, 23; first session of legislature, 24-25; second session of legislature, 25; basis of representation in, 25; petition for statehood, 26; population in 1818 and 1819, 26; speculation in land in, 26; rapidly passes to statehood, 29
Aldrich, Truman H., contested election case, 219n, 220-221 and n
Aldrich, William F., contested election case, 219n
Amendments and 1819 Constitution, agitation for amending, 47; limited tenure for judges, 48-51; biennial sessions, 51-55; removal of capital ( 1845), 55-63; removal of capital linked with biennial sessions, 57; popular election of county and circuit judges ( 1849), 64-67; census amendment ( 1849), 67; proposed amendments ( 1819-1861), 68-72; democratic features of 1819 Constitution make many amendments unnecessary, 70; error in biennial sessions amendment, 73; biennial elections but annual sessessions of legislature defeated ( 1859), 75; on election of comptroller and treasurer defeated ( 1859), 75
Amendments and 1875 Constitution, the Birmingham Amendment ( 1895), 234- 235; the road tax amendment ( 1885), 236; the Hundley Amendment, 237- 238; local legislation amendment, 241, 247; proposed amendments, 247; difficulties of amending, 247-248; advantages of amendments to, over a convention, 248; Johnston prefers amendments to convention, 256; and power of the executive regarding, 256-257
Amendments and 1901 Constitution, Boswell Amendment, 298n; poll tax

-385-

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