The Political Olympics: Moscow, Afghanistan, and the 1980 U.S. Boycott

By Derick L. Hulme Jr. | Go to book overview

6
Endemic Obstacles to the Boycott

The United States-sponsored boycott encountered numerous obstacles in the course of its implementation. Foremost among these barriers were difficulties endemic to any attempt to effect a boycott of the Olympic Games. These problems would have existed for any administration, and were not the result of incompetence or miscalculation. A second category of difficulties, however, stemmed directly from shortcomings associated with the White House. Errors were made, for a variety of reasons, which heightened the problem of developing a broadly based international response to the Afghanistan invasion focusing upon the Olympic Games. Once we identify the two distinct causes for the boycott's difficulties, we will be able to determine how the failure to implement the boycott appropriately compounded the problems inherent in this particular endeavor.


CONSTRAINTS IMPOSED BY THE STRUCTURE OF THE INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL SYSTEM

Lacking a centralized decision-making and enforcement body, the horizontally structured international system presents significant obstacles to those states seeking to act in collective fashion. 1 While powerful states can, if willing to expend the necessary resources, use force or the threat of force to gain the support of lesser states, such efforts are costly and create resentment. However, absent such tactics, collective action remains elusive; states tend to pursue what they perceive as their own short-term self-interest since each state is forced to perceive all other states as actual or potential threats. 2

-89-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Political Olympics: Moscow, Afghanistan, and the 1980 U.S. Boycott
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 186

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.