The Political Olympics: Moscow, Afghanistan, and the 1980 U.S. Boycott

By Derick L. Hulme Jr. | Go to book overview

Notes

PREFACE
1.
Although there had been opposition to Moscow's hosting of the 1980 Olympics soon after the International Olympic Committee's ( IOC's) decision in 1974 in favor of the Soviet entry (see Lord Killanin comments in "My Olympic Years", [ New York: William Morrow and Company, 1983], 173), the trial of Soviet scientist and dissident Anatoly Shcharansky in 1978 renewed the debate and first brought the idea of a boycott to the American public's attention. President Carter opted against such a policy ( David B. Kanin , A Political History of the Olympic Games [ Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press, 1981], 116 [hereafter cited as Political History]). Despite accusations in Pravda that Carter had shown himself opposed to the Moscow Games both at the time of the Shcharansky trial in 1978 and during the furor over the presence of Soviet troops in Cuba in 1979 ( Current Digest of the Soviet Press, Apr. 16, 1980, 7-8 [hereafter cited as Soviet Press]), Carter never put forth the idea of an Olympic boycott prior to the unfolding of events in Afghanistan.
2.
See David B. Kanin, "The Role of Sport in International Relations" (Ph.D. diss., The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, 1976 [hereafter cited as "Role of Sport"]).
3.
John Vinocur, New York Times, 2 Jan. 1980, A12 (hereafter cited as NYT).
4.
Jimmy Carter, Keeping Faith: Memoirs of a President ( Toronto: Bantam Books, 1982), 473 (hereafter cited as Memoirs).
5.
Allan Mayer et al., Newsweek, 28 Jan. 1980, 20-28.
6.
NYT, 5 Jan. 1980, A6.
7.
This is not to argue that morality has no place in international relations. Charles Beitz makes a persuasive argument that indeed "There are no reasons of basic principle for exempting the internal affairs of states from external moral scrutiny." However, Beitz acknowledges the concerns raised by theorists such as George Kennan about mo

-129-

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The Political Olympics: Moscow, Afghanistan, and the 1980 U.S. Boycott
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments iv
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - The Boycott Decision 17
  • 3 - The Domestic Campaign 21
  • 4 - The International Campaign 43
  • 5 - Consequences of the Boycott 75
  • 6 - Endemic Obstacles to the Boycott 89
  • 7 - U.S. Shortcomings 105
  • 8 - Evaluation of the Use of the Boycott 123
  • Notes 129
  • Selected Bibliography 169
  • Index 171
  • About the Author 181
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