Order in Multiplicity: Homonymy in the Philosophy of Aristotle

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Acknowledgements

I began preliminary research for this book while an Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung Research Fellow, affiliated with the Seminar für Klassische Philologie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Mainz. I thank the AvH Foundation for its generous support, and my hosts in Mainz, Wolfgang Bernard and Arbogast Schmitt, for their warm intellectual and personal hospitality. My research there resulted in an article published in Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie in 1993, some portions of which provide a basis for the discussions of Chapter 5. I thank the editors of AGP for permission to use material derived from that article. I also thank Peter Momtchiloff at Oxford University Press for his support and excellent advice, together with Angela Blackburn and her skilled staff at Invisible Ink for their highly professional assistance in preparing the typescript for publication.

I composed most of the first draft of this book in 1992-3, in Oxford, while a Visiting Fellow of Corpus Christi College. The President and Fellows of that college provided an exceptional environment for sustained research and productive exchange. I thank them all, but most especially Christopher Taylor, Ewen Bowie, and Ian Bostridge. Some of my first formed thoughts on these matters were presented that same year to a seminar led by David Charles and Stephen Everson at Balliol. Their acute objections pertaining especially to Aristotle's conception of signification helped me to filter out some unhelpful matter from the early chapters.

Similar thanks are due to two sets of graduate students, one at the University of Colorado at Boulder and the other at Stanford University, who were kind enough to discuss the main themes of this book in two related seminars. I thank them especially for insisting that Aristotle's views be made accessible to scrutiny. I also thank individually William Simpson, Ellen Wagner, Richard Geenen, Richard Cameron, Michael Peirce, and Paul Studtmann, all students from whom I have learnt more than I taught.

Because I have had the good fortune to present the materials of individual chapters to audiences at a host of leading institutions and learned societies, I have enjoyed the judicious criticisms of a now uncountable number of auditors. I can still discern the influence of. Robert Bolton, Myles Burnyeat, Daniel Devereaux, Gail Fine, Güven Güzeldere, Norman Kretzmann, Frank Lewis, Gareth Matthews, and Fred Miller.

Through less formal settings, I have enjoyed stimulating exchanges on these matters with: James Anderson, Gabriela Carone, John Fisher, David

-vii-

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