Following the Equator: A Journey around the World - Vol. 1

By Mark Twain | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXVII

Man is the Only Animal that Blushes. Or needs to.

-- puddn'head Wilson's New Calendar.

The universal brotherhood of man is our most precious possession, what there is of it.--Pudd'nhead Wilson's New Calendar.

F ROM D IARY:

NOV. 1--Noon. A fine day, a brilliant sun. Warm in the sun, cold in the shade--an icy breeze blowing out of the south. A solemn long swell rolling up northward. It comes from the South Pole, with nothing in the way to obstruct its march and tone its energy down. I have read somewhere that an acute observer among the early explorers--Cook? or Tasman?--accepted this majestic swell as trustworthy circumstantial evidence that no important land lay to the southward, and so did not waste time on a useless quest in that direction, but changed his course and went searching elsewhere.

Afternoon. Passing between Tasmania (formerly Van Diemen's Land) and neighboring islands-- islands whence the poor exiled Tasmanian savages used to gaze at their lost homeland and cry; and die of broken hearts. How glad I am that all these native races are dead and gone, or nearly so. The work was mercifully swift and horrible in some portions of Australia. As far as Tasmania is concerned, the extermination was complete: not a

-238-

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Following the Equator: A Journey around the World - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 12
  • Chapter III 27
  • Chapter IV 44
  • Chapter V 56
  • Chapter VI 63
  • Chapter VII 72
  • Chapter VIII 80
  • Chapter IX 89
  • Chapter X 101
  • Chapter XI 107
  • Chapter XII 114
  • Chapter XIII 118
  • Chapter XIV 131
  • Chapter XV 137
  • Chapter XVI 143
  • Chapter XIX 167
  • Chapter XX 175
  • Chapter XXI 183
  • Chapter XXII 193
  • Chapter XXIII 203
  • Chapter XXIV 211
  • Chapter XXV 220
  • Chapter XXVI 232
  • Chapter XXVII 238
  • Chapter XXVIII 250
  • Chapter XXX 268
  • Chapter XXXI 274
  • Chapter XXXII 282
  • Chapter XXXIII 291
  • Chapter XXXIV 298
  • Chapter XXXV 303
  • Chapter XXXVI 310
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