Human Rights of Women: National and International Perspectives

By Rebecca J. Cook | Go to book overview

Chapter 17
Challenges to the Application of International Women's Human Rights in the Sudan

Asma Mohamed Abdel Halim


Introduction

The struggle for women's rights in the Sudan started nearly fifty years ago. At that time, few women were educated and those who were lived mainly in the major cities. The Sudanese Women's Union fought fiercely for women's rights and promoted women's education. The Women's Union and other groups had a great impact on changing the personal law rules at that time so that they were less harsh.

The struggle for women's rights continues today. Only recently have women begun to address women's rights as human rights. Women, particularly those active on a grass-roots level, have never addressed their problems in terms of international law, but women have challenged discriminatory laws by relying strictly on those mechanisms available within the domestic law. This chapter will address the challenges to the application of international law of human rights in the Sudan.

As a religious state the Sudan has adopted, since 1983, laws based on Islamic law. The fundamental sources of Islamic law are the Qur'an, which is believed to be the literal word of God, and the Sunna, the traditions of the Prophet Mohammed. Both the Qur'an and the Sunna have been subjects of extensive interpretation and counter-interpretation since the death of the Prophet in 632.1 This process has resulted in the Shari'a, the comprehensive codes governing subjects ranging from religious dogma and practice to ethical norms and rules of private law. Individual rights are governed by the Shari'a. Customary law governs the parts of the country that are predominantly Christian.

The interpretation of Qur'anic verses is an important part, perhaps

-397-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Human Rights of Women: National and International Perspectives
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 640

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.