The Cambridge History of American Literature

By William Peterfield Trent; John Erskine et al. | Go to book overview

CONTENTS
BOOK I COLONIAL AND REVOLUTIONARY LITERATURE
CHAPTER I TRAVELLERS AND EXPLORERS, 1583-1763

By GEORGE PARKER WINSHIP, A.M., Librarian of the Harry Elkins Widener Collection, Harvard University.

PAGE

The Earliest Adventurers. Captain John Smith. Newfoundland. William Vaughn. Robert Hayman. Robert Sedgwick. Pamphlets of the Land Companies. Narratives of Indian Captivities. Mrs. Rowlandson. John Gyles. Jonathan Dickinson. The Quakers. Alice Curwen. George Keith. Sarah Knight. William Byrd. Dr. Alexander Hamilton1

CHAPTER II THE HISTORIANS, 1607-1783

By JOHN SPENCER BASSETT, Ph.D., Professor of American History in Smith College.

Captain John Smith. His Veracity. Early New England Historians. "Mourt's" Relation. Edward Winslow. William Bradford. John Winthrop. Edward Johnson. Nathaniel Morton. Later New England Historians. Narratives of the Indian Wars. Captain John Mason. Rev. William Hubbard. Benjamin Church. Samuel Penhallow. Daniel Gookin. Cadwallader Colden. John Lawson. Political Histories. Robert Beverley. Rev. William Stith. William Smith. Samuel Smith. Rev. Thomas Prince. Thomas Hutchinson 14

CHAPTER III THE PURITAN DIVINES, 1620-1720

By VERNON LOUIS PARRINGTON, A.M., Professor of English in the University of Washington.

Puritans and Politics. Puritanism as Jacobean Radicalism. Types of Church Polity Corresponding to Types of State Polity -- Monarchical, Aristocratic, Democratic. Early New England Congregationalism a Compromise between Aristocracy and Democracy. The Emigrants: the Theocratic Group -- John Cotton, Nathaniel Ward, John Eliot; the Democratic Group -- Roger Williams, Thomas Hooker. The Second Generation: the Theocratic Group -- the Mathers; the Democrats -- John Wise. Learning of the Puritan Divines. Their Industry. Their Influence. 31

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Cambridge History of American Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 584

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.