The Economic Basis of Peace: Linkages between Economic Growth and International Conflict

By William H. Mott IV | Go to book overview

1
Introduction

For most of the twentieth century the most salient features of the international political-economy have been the chiaroscuro of international conflict and the panorama of economic growth. Any connections between them, suggested occasionally by observers since at least Aristotle, have seemed vague, intermittent, and probably situation-specific. Following centuries of epistemological tradition, modern analysts continue to note, and orthodox economic and political-scientific theories allow, some mildly causal, or at least stimulative, relationship between economic growth and international conflict. "Economic objectives, resources, and instruments of foreign policy have always been significant elements in the struggles between political groups." 1 Beyond broad aphorisms and intuitive assertions of this sort, and occasional interesting speculations about human nature, orthodoxy has simply accepted that some natural relationship exists between economic growth and international conflict. Secure within their own disciplines, historians, economists, and political scientists have largely ignored the cross-disciplinary question of how and why such a relationship works, or even what it is.

Beyond the obvious insight that there seem to be some parallels between politics and economics, between conflict and growth, or between trade and war, neither empiricism nor theory has produced general explanations of what those relationships are, or how they work. Only by combining, selecting, or compromising among various sets of data and integrating convenient bits of various theories has orthodoxy been able even to approach a weak, ambiguous, highly conditional generality, the same that was deduced three millennia ago by Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle (see sources in Notes to Chapter 2): growth could sometimes lead to war.

The ancients and the classicists seem to have been comfortable with this sort of vapid, ambiguous separation between the essential processes of international relations. Contemporary analysts and decision-makers, however, need more in confronting political-economic realities that confound traditional

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Economic Basis of Peace: Linkages between Economic Growth and International Conflict
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 310

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.