The Nahuas after the Conquest: A Social and Cultural History of the Indians of Central Mexico, Sixteenth through Eighteenth Centuries

By James Lockhart | Go to book overview

Glossary
Albacea (S). Executor of a testament
Alcalde (S). A first-instance judge who is at the same time member of a municipal council (cabildo)
Alcaide mayor (S). Chief magistrate in a given area, appointed from outside; in this book, generally the chief Spanish judicial and administrative official in a jurisdiction embracing several altepetl; often used interchangeably with corregidor
Almud (S). Unit of dry measure, one twelfth of a fanega
Altepetl (N). Any sovereign state; in central Mexico, generally the local ethnic states the Spaniards were to call pueblos. They became municipalities after the conquest and are sometimes called towns in this book.
Altepetlalli (N). "Altepetl land"; any land over which the altepetl has jurisdiction, in practice usually empty land that the corporation may redistribute, the same as calpollalli
Audiencia (Royal Audienca) (S). High court, here the one residing in Mexico City and with jurisdiction for all New Spain
Barrio (S). Subdistrict of a municipality; here subdistrict of an altepetl, equivalent to tlaxilacalli or calpolli
Braza (S). Among Spaniards, a unit of measure equal to a fathom; also used for the larger, regionally variable unit predominant among the indigenous population
Caballeria (S). A land grant of moderate size intended for intensive agricultural use
Cabildo (S). Municipal council in the Spanish style
Cacicazgo (S, based on "cacique"). An indigenous rulership or the title and establishment going with it; a neologism on the model of "mayorazgo"
Cacique (S, from Arawak). Indian ruler, tlatoani; in late colonial Spanish, any prominent Indian
Callalli (N). "House-land"; a household's central agricultural plot, associated with its residence
Calpollalli (N). "Calpolli land"; land subject to redistribution by the calpolli
Calpolli (N). Constituent part, subdistrict of an altepetl
Calque. Translation of a foreign idiom by using equivalent native vocabulary for its constituent parts even though they would not have originally yielded that overall meaning in the native language
Chinampa (S, from N). Artificial raised plot for intensive agriculture built up in shallow water

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