A Survey of Indian Assimilation in Eastern Sonora

By Thomas B. Hinton | Go to book overview

PREFACE

THE PURPOSE of this work was to survey eastern Sonora in an attempt to determine what, if anything, remains of the aboriginal groups to that area.

In the course of the survey, all settlements larger than small ranches in the old Opata and Jova area were covered, with the exception of those in the upper Bavispe Valley above Huásabas, Bacoachi and Chinapa north of Arispe, the town of Alamos south of Ures, and Soyopa on the Yaqui River. Unless otherwise indicated, all settlements mentioned in this paper were visited at least once. I feel justified in including data from towns not visited since residents of these towns were encountered and interviewed. Using Tepupa as a base, I covered the Valley of Sahuaripa and adjoining portions of the Sierra Madre into Chihuahua in addition to the Valley of Batuc. The San Miguel, Mátape, Bacanora, and middle Yaqui river valleys were visited several times, as was the Moctezuma area. Less information was collected from the upper portions of the Sonora Valley, so the coverage there is less complete than in the other sectors of Opata Sonora.

Whenever possible I stayed with Indian families and gathered data from both Indian and non-Indian residents of the area. Interviews were both formal and informal. The language used was exclusively Spanish. This paper is a synthesis of these data in addition to those gained by personal observation.

I am indebted to E. H. Spicer for his direction, his suggestions and encouragement. The manuscript was critically read by Dr. Ralph Beals of the University of California at Los Angeles and by Mrs. Paul Ezell of San Diego, California. The help of both is gratefully acknowledged. At the time of this survey Roger C. Owen was studying a community of Indian background in northern-central Sonora. I am grateful to him for numerous useful comments and suggestions. In addition, the interest and encouragement of Mrs. Clara Lee Tanner and Dr. Harry Getty of the University of Arizona are much appreciated. Finally, I wish to acknowledge my debt to the many Sonorans for their hospitality and interested cooperation.

This paper is the result of field work undertaken between April and August, 1955 and in June of 1956 through a Comin's Fund fellowship from the Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona and under the direction of Dr. E. H. Spicer of that department.

THOMAS B. HINTON University of California July 1, 1959

-5-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Survey of Indian Assimilation in Eastern Sonora
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 32

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.