The Educational Writings of John Locke: A Critical Edition with Introduction and Notes

By James L. Axtell; John Locke | Go to book overview

5
PIERRE COSTE AND THE EUROPEAN 'EDUCATION'

Pierre Coste, the young French Huguenot who informed Locke in 1695 of his French translation of the Education, was born in October 1668 in the medieval town of Uzès in Languedoc, one of the productive sun-soaked provinces of France on the rim of the Mediterranean. A substantial cloth and wool merchant, his father could afford to give him a good education, so he was sent to the collège at Anduze to acquire the rudiments of learning. At the age of fifteen he was sent to Geneva where he matriculated at the university. A year later, when Louis XIV finally revoked the Edict of Nantes at which he had been chipping for many years, Coste, the seventeen-year-old heir to a Huguenot upbringing, found himself an exile from his homeland.

Having been intended for the ministry but now with no possible hope of assuming the cloth in France, he nevertheless continued his classical education in Hebrew, Greek, Latin, Italian and the belles lettres, living as best he could in Lausanne, Zürich, and finally Leiden in the receptive tolerance of Holland. In 1690, however, his formal education behind him, he secured a pastorship in the Walloon church in Amsterdam. But he found himself stifled and uncomfortable in a clerical collar and soon escaped as a proof-reader to the publishing community that made Holland the nerve center of the Republic of Letters in the second half of the seventeenth century. It was only a matter of time until the pulpit was completely forsaken1 and he began the task that was to consume the rest of his life, that of bringing many of the best English works, especially those of Locke, to French-speaking Europe.

On 14 September 1693 Pierre Bayle, the encyclopaedic journalist of Rotterdam, wrote to a friend in Switzerland: 'Someone is working here to render into French the Thoughts that Mr. Locke, one of the most profound metaphysicians of this century, has

____________________
1
Although as late as July 1695 Jean LeClerc could describe him as 'a student in theology' ( Bonno, 1959, p. 86). All translations from the French are mine, except where specified otherwise.

-88-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Educational Writings of John Locke: A Critical Edition with Introduction and Notes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 450

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.