The Great Crusade and after, 1914-1928 - Vol. 12

By Preston William Slosson | Go to book overview

ILLUSTRATIONS
(By the Editors)
PLATE
I. THE METROPOLIS

A view of New York from Governor's Island. From an etching by Anton Schutz. The tallest tower, that of the Bank of the Manhattan Company, was not actually completed until 1930, though it was planned in, 1928 and 1929. The artist, born and educated in Germany and after his arrival in this country an instructor in the Art Students' League in New York City, made his reputation as one of America's most successful etchers largely on the basis of his views of city buildings.

II. GERMANY'S CHALLENGE

The report in the New York Tribune, May 8, 1915, of the sinking of the Lusitania eight miles off the Irish coast, while on its way from New York to Liverpool, by a German submarine the previous afternoon. Actually 1152 persons, 114 of them Americans, lost their lives.

III. THE LIBERTY LOAN

From a painting by Walter De Maris, entitled "The Liberty Loan, 1918". owned by the American Bankers' Association Journal, by whose permission it is here reproduced. The scene will be recognized as in Wall Street, New York City, looking past the Subtreasury Building toward Trinity Church.

IV. THE AFTERMATH OF WAR
a. A cartoon entitled "Our own yard is enough to worry about", by William Ireland ( 1880- ). It was published in the Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch, March 4, 1924, with which newspaper Mr. Ireland became associated in 1899. The opinion here represented was widespread throughout the Middle West, though, of course, there were other reasons for refraining from world cooperation besides the one here indicated. On the other hand, many of those in the East who favored joining the League of Nations were bitter critics of corruption and inefficiency in the federal government. This certainly had been the official attitude of the Democratic party.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Great Crusade and after, 1914-1928 - Vol. 12
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Contents ix
  • Index 467
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 486

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.