A Book of British Etching: From Francis Barlow to Francis Seymour Haden

By Walter Shaw Sparrow | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II
WITH HOLLAR AND VAN DYCK MAINLY

I

IT is right to begin with Hollar, the etching historian of seventeenth- century London and Windsor, and much more that is entertaining. His versatility embraces architecture, topography, landscape and seascape, portraiture, costume, natural history, allegory, mythology, scriptural subjects, historical pieces, still life of many kinds, and also sporting scenes (after Francis Cleyn and Francis Barlow). What a diversity of appeal I And it comes to us, not from flightiness of temperament, but from a simple-hearted and firm liking for all visible things. Hollar could have applied to himself, quite justly, what Montaigne answered when praised by Henry III of France. Henry said, "I like your book." "Then," returned Montaigne, "Your Majesty must needs like me. My book is myself." Similarly, Hollar's etched work is autobiography as well as graphic art. We find in its prints and drawings the bitter struggles of his life and his full character, which students love increasingly.

A long grapple against bad times compelled Hollar to do a great many hack jobs, yet even this part of his immense output has qualities of honour, giving more in skilled workmanship than the small payment he received really bought from his daily needs as a married citizen. When we remember that Parthey's catalogue of Hollar's etchings contains more than 2700 plates, though incomplete, the marvel is that he did not suffer much more than we perceive from incessant overstrain. There is never any need to think worse of his breaks and falls than we do of a good athlete who finds a running track too heavy for his physical strength, or is put out of form by too much training.

-14-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Book of British Etching: From Francis Barlow to Francis Seymour Haden
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 230

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.