A World in Flames: A Short History of the Second World War in Europe and Asia, 1939-1945

By Martin Kitchen | Go to book overview

CHAPTER EIGHT
Europe under the Nazis

Hitler's vision of a German-dominated Europe went far beyond any previous notions of power politics and hegemony. The guiding principle of his 'New Order' in Europe was racial. Thus the 'Nordic' peoples -- Scandinavian, Dutch and Flemish -- were to form the basis of the new Europe and stand united against the vast hordes of racially inferior Slavs in the east whose lands would be seized and exploited by Germanic colonists.

At first the Germans moved cautiously. Their long-term aims were disguised behind conventional if harsh occupation policies. France was divided into occupied and unoccupied zones, but Alsace-Lorraine was not formally annexed, nor was Luxembourg. Hitler intended to annex eastern France from the mouth of the Somme to the Argonne and Lake Geneva, thus incorporating Champagne, Burgundy and the Franche Comté into the Reich. A truncated France would never again be able to challenge Germany.

In Belgium the mining areas of Eupen, Malmedy and Moresnet were annexed in May 1940. Hitler proclaimed Wallonia in the south to be ancient German land and that the Flemish areas were an integral part of the 'Greater Germanic Reich'. The Germans permitted the Flemish National Association (VNV) to act as the political voice of the Flemish, but although the party was entrusted with important administrative posts by the occupation forces, its political aim was unification with Holland rather than with Germany. The Germans therefore sponsored a new party, the German-Flemish Association (DEVLAS), whose professed aim was the unification of Flanders and Germany.

In Wallonia there was already a home-grown fascist movement led by Léon Degrelle and the Germans indulged in some remarkable

-183-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A World in Flames: A Short History of the Second World War in Europe and Asia, 1939-1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 382

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.