Desire and Death in the Spanish Sentimental Romance (1440-1550)

By Patricia E. Grieve | Go to book overview

5
Juan de Segura's Processo de cartas de amores and Luzindaro y Medusina: Return to the Prototype

"Vençen el seso los dulçes errores, mas non duran sienpre segund luego plazen; pues me fizieron del mal que vos fazen, sabed al amor desamar, amadores."

MACÍAS, in Laberinto de Fortuna, stanza 106

THE APPEARANCE IN 1548 of Juan de Segura work, lengthily entitled Processo de cartas de amores que entre dos amantes pasaron, con una carta del autor para un amigo suyo, pidiéndole consuelo y Quexa y aviso de un caballero llamado Luzindaro contra Amor y una dama y sus casos, con deleitoso estilo de proceder hasta el fin de ambos; sacado del estilo griego en nuestro castellano, seems to be an anachronism, and, paradoxically, the innovator of a literary genre, the epistolary novel.1 The first part

____________________
1
Processo de cartas is the first prose work to be written in complete epistolary fashion, but it can in no way be considered a novel, although its imitators may indeed be novels. Rather it is a romance of frustrated love. I analyze the use of anachronism in this work, and Segura's awareness of Renaissance literary theory, in a forthcoming article "Anachronism in the work of a 'Careless' Counterfeiter: The Case of Juan de Segura."

-94-

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