Philadelphia: Neighborhoods, Division, and Conflict in a Postindustrial City

By Carolyn Adams; David Bartelt et al. | Go to book overview

Preface

This book has been a unique and complex endeavor, linking the specialties and academic styles of six coauthors across several disciplines and interest areas. What united us on this task was the central goal of the book--to explain as completely as possible what has happened to Philadelphia and its metropolitan area in the past four decades. At once both historical and sociological, it focuses on the centrality of economic change and corresponding political, demographic, and social movements with the region.

Philadelphia is a city wracked by conflict and facing a difficult future. Its civic and political life often threatens to devolve into casting blame on one group or another for its current difficulties. If there is one message that resonates throughout this book, it is simply this--that the city and its surrounding communities are caught in the throes of a wrenching social and economic shift that must be confronted head on. Above all, this struggle must not be overwhelmed by internecine struggles between various constituencies, communities, or neighborhoods for a larger slice of a shrinking pie. The forces of economic change have transformed an industrial city into a postindustrial metropolis--and have, we would argue, increased the payoff for coordinated regional actions while simultaneously dividing one neighborhood from the other, one ethnic group from another, and one gender from the other.

This divided metropolis faces a tenuous future, yet we know that it will survive--the only question is in what form. If this book helps focus discussions of alternatives for the city and the region, we will be gratified. If we have increased our readers' understanding of the current social frameworks of their day-to-day situations, we will be similarly gratified. For this volume is both an academic treatise and a labor of love and concern for this city.

In any coauthored work some means of identifying the specific responsibilities of each of the authors is needed. Carolyn Adams and David Bartelt alternated responsibility for pushing the project from beginning to end. They jointly wrote the introductory chapter, with contributions from David Elesh. Adams also prepared Chapter 5, dealing with the political changes in Philadelphia, and was responsible for Chapters 6 and 7.

Bartelt was responsible for the housing chapter (Chapter 3) and was assisted by Ira Goldstein, who did much of the analysis dealing with gen

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Philadelphia: Neighborhoods, Division, and Conflict in a Postindustrial City
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • COMPARATIVE AMERICAN CITIES ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Tables and Figures vii
  • Preface xi
  • Series Preface xiii
  • 1 - The Legacy of the Industrial City 3
  • 2 - Economic Erosion and the Growth of Inequality 30
  • 3 - Housing and Neighborhoods 66
  • 4 - Philadelphia's Redevelopment Process 100
  • 5 - Race, Class, and Philadelphia Politics 124
  • 6 - The Prospects for City-Suburban Accommodation 154
  • 7 - Alternative Scenarios for Philadelphia's Future 175
  • Appendixes 183
  • Notes 189
  • Index 203
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 210

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.