Artistic Theory in Italy, 1450-1600

By Anthony Blunt | Go to book overview

PREFACE TO SECOND IMPRESSION

THIS second impression is, except for the corrections of minor mistakes and small additions to the bibliography, an exact reprint of the first edition. This does not imply that there is nothing in the book which I think should be altered; in fact, it implies exactly the opposite. Now I should not dare to write such a book at all. The capacity to make broad generalizations, to concentrate a number of ideas into a small compass in the hope that they will convey more of truth than of falsehood, is the result either of the rashness of youth or the wisdom of age. In the intervening period caution takes control, and if I were now to attempt a revision of this book, I should want to qualify every sentence with so many dependent clauses and parentheses that the book would lose whatever utility it has, which is, I hope, to provide an introduction to the subject which may stimulate the reader to pursue it further.


PREFACE TO THE FOURTH IMPRESSION

THE arguments stated in the preface to the second impression still apply, and I have made no attempt to revise the text of this book systematically. I have corrected a few mistakes which had survived into the second edition and have removed a few references to out-of-date literature. The Bibliography has, however, been completely revised and extended to include the large number of new and often well annotated editions of texts which have appeared in the last ten or fifteen years.

1978.

-iii-

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Artistic Theory in Italy, 1450-1600
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • ARTISTIC THEORY IN ITALY 1450-1600 *
  • Title Page i
  • PREFACE TO SECOND IMPRESSION iii
  • PREFACE TO THE FOURTH IMPRESSION iii
  • PREFACE TO FIRST EDITION v
  • Contents vii
  • List of Plates viii
  • Chapter I Alberti 1
  • Chapter II Leonardo 23
  • Chapter III Colonna: Filarete 39
  • Chapter IV the Social Position of the Artist 48
  • Chapter V Michelangelo 58
  • Chapter VI the Minor Writers of the High Renaissance 82
  • Chapter VII Vasari 86
  • Chapter VIII the Council of Trent and Religious Art 103
  • Chapter IX the Later Mannerists 137
  • Bibliography 160
  • Index 167
  • THE OXFORD AUTHORS 172
  • HISTORY IN OXFORD PAPERBACKS TUDOR ENGLAND 173
  • OXFORD REFERENCE THE CONCISE OXFORD COMPANION TO ENGLISH LITERATURE 174
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