Josephus and the Jews: The Religion and History of the Jews as Explained by Flavius Josephus

By F. J. Foakes-Jackson | Go to book overview
Save to active project

CHAPTER VII
THE FALL OF THE ASMONAEANS AND THE RISE OF THE HERODS

Rivalry of the sons of Alexander Jannaeus . -- The Asmonaean priesthood, like the older line, suffered from dissension between brothers. After the death of Hyrcanus I, Aristobulus and Antigonus were rivals; and Alexander Jannaeus, when he succeeded, instantly put one of his brothers to death. When Queen Alexandra died, a fraternal strife between her sons began, which lasted for three generations, and resulted in the ruin of the house which had delivered Israel from the yoke of the heathen.

Alexander's two sons were very different in character; the elder, Hyrcanus, was of a mild and peaceful disposition, and Aristobulus the younger a man of energy and ambition. The Pharisees gave their allegiance to Hyrcanus, whilst the party of the Sadducees favoured the more enterprising Aristobulus. But Hyrcanus was made a match for his warlike brother by the support of an Idumaean sheik, who with the rest of his countrymen had embraced Judaism, namely Antipater, who was later excelled both as a warrior and as a statesman by his sons, especially Herod, known as 'The Great.'

Power of Rome in the East. -- For more than a century, since the battle of Magnesia in 190 B.C., Rome had been the dominant factor in the politics of the Near East; and she was rapidly exchanging her role of a powerful influence for that of the recognised mistress of the different countries which made up Asia Minor, Syria,

-121-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Josephus and the Jews: The Religion and History of the Jews as Explained by Flavius Josephus
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 299

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?