Language, Mind, and Brain

By Thomas W. Simon; Robert J. Scholes et al. | Go to book overview

LANGUAGE, MIND, AND BRAIN

Edited by:

Thomas W. Simon

Robert J. Scholes

University of Florida

1982 LAWRENCE ERLBAUM ASSOCIATES, PUBLISHERS Hillsdale, New Jersey London

-iii-

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Language, Mind, and Brain
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface and Orientation xi
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS xiii
  • For the Sloan Foundation xv
  • Neoconstructivism: A Unifying Theme for the Cognitive Sciences 1
  • References 10
  • 1: Logic, Reasoning, and Logical Form 13
  • References 18
  • 2: Variable-Free Semantics with Remarks on Procedural Extensions 21
  • References 33
  • 3: Speaking of Imagination 35
  • REFERENCE 43
  • 4: Artificial Intelligence and Semantic Theory 45
  • References 63
  • 5: Intensional Logic and Natural Language 65
  • Introduction 65
  • References 73
  • 6: How Far can you Trust a Linguist? 75
  • References 86
  • 7: Propositional and Algorithmic Semantics 89
  • References 101
  • 8: Inference in the Conceptual Dependency Paradigm: A Personal History 103
  • Introduction 103
  • 9: Implications of Language Studies for Human Nature 129
  • Introduction 129
  • Conclusion 141
  • References 142
  • 10: Experiential Factors in Linguistics 145
  • References 155
  • 11: Grammar and Sequencing in Language 157
  • References 176
  • 12: Psycholinguistic Experiment and Linguistic Intuition 179
  • References 187
  • 13: Metaphor and Mental Duality 189
  • References 209
  • 14: Computations and Representations 213
  • Introduction 213
  • EPILOGUE 221
  • References 222
  • 15: The Cognitive Sciences: A Semiotic Paradigm 225
  • Introduction 225
  • SUMMARY 239
  • Acknowledgments 239
  • References 239
  • 16: Animal Communication as Evidence of Thinking 241
  • References 249
  • 17: Philosophy of Science and Recent Research on Language, Mind, and Brain 251
  • Author Index 255
  • Subject Index 261
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