Mythopoetic Perspectives of Men's Healing Work: An Anthology for Therapists and Others

By Edward Read Barton | Go to book overview

was the belief that this key had been taken from them and hidden. Their discovery of gold was the discovery that the key was theirs all along and that they could now own it openly and with integrity, for it had not been obtained through deceit but rather through rightful ownership and proclamation.

Integrity therapy is an existential framework of therapy that allows men to discover the unique keys with which to unlock their iron cages and begin a process of repair, healing, discovery, and growth. By exploring their fidelity to their value systems, men who travel on the mythopoetic journey are able to find a safe haven in which to understand and secure their unique identities as males and as human beings. Through this process, they can begin to rework their relationships with others. Integrity therapy allows each man to find his own way and to discover his own beingness, his own authentic wild man, his own male shadow ( Kipnis, 1991), his own anima, his own priest, his own warrior, his own dark side, and ultimately his own potential to choose good over evil. Through daring to struggle for a higher level of integrity, he becomes true to himself, and becomes able to follow the mythopoetic path of the human journey with integrity and with a sense of wellness and well-being in community with other men and with women.


REFERENCES

Allen M. ( 1994). Angry men, passive men: Understanding the roots of men's anger and how to move beyond it. New York: Fawcett Columbine.

Bliss S. ( 1995). Mythopoetic men's movement. In M. S. Kimmel (Ed.), The politics of manhood: Profeminist men respond to the mythopoetic men's movement (and the mythopoetic leaders answer) (pp. 292-307). Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

Bly R. ( 1990). Iron John: A book about men. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley.

Coleman J. C. ( 1976). Abnormal psychology and modern life. Glenview, IL: Scott, Foresman.

Frankl V. ( 1992). Man's search for ultimate meaning. New York: Insight Books/Plenum Press.

Gerwood J. B. ( 1998). The legacy of Viktor Frankl: An appreciation upon his death. Psychological Reports, 82( 2), 673-674.

Guarnaschelli J. ( 1994). Men's support groups and the men's movement: Their role for men and for women. Group, 18( 4), 197-211.

Kipnis A. ( 1991). Knights without armour. Los Angeles: Jeremy P. Tarcher.

Lander N. R. ( 1986, October). Hobart Mowrer's integrity (therapy) groups. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Canadian Group Psychotherapy Association, Gray Rocks, Quebec.

Lander N. R., & D. Nahon ( 1986). Treating the "untreatable" patient: A case study in unlabelling. Paper presented at the American Psychological Association annual meeting, Washington, DC.

Lander N. R., & Nahon D. ( 1988a, August). Mowrer's integrity therapy: An old concept revisited. Paper presented at the American Psychological Association annual meeting, Atlanta, GA.

-142-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mythopoetic Perspectives of Men's Healing Work: An Anthology for Therapists and Others
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 290

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.