The Making of United States International Economic Policy: Principles, Problems, and Proposals for Reform

By Stephen D. Cohen | Go to book overview

Introduction and Acknowledgments

International economic policy straddles the two highest priorities of the modern nation-state: economic prosperity and national security. It is simultaneously the external dimension of domestic economic policy and the economic component of foreign policy. This strategic positioning presents a dilemma for international economic policy: its unique characteristics are seldom studied and analyzed as a separate and distinct phenomenon. For too long, it has been viewed either as a low-level subordinate by foreign policy officials or as a foreign cousin by domestic economic policy practitioners. The failure of most U.S. policymakers to respect international economic policy as a distinct entity has been a critical factor in shaping the substance of that policy. Caught between the domestic economic and foreign policy machines, this policy has often been inconsistent, inappropriate, or tepid.

As a consequence, the importance of international economic policy continues to outpace the quality of its content and the efficiency of its conduct. The spiraling dynamic of global interdependence suggests that a second- or third-best U.S. international economic policy already is a costly burden for all major participants in the world economy. The international economic challenges of the twenty-first century are sure to intensify. The United States and its trading partners will be better off if decision-makers and the public at large possess a better understanding of international economic policy. It is also to everyone's advantage if the United States has the best possible organization and procedures to formulate and implement that policy. As used in this book, the policymaking process encompasses a number of different activities: planning, data collection and assessment, identification of problems, articulation of options, making specific decisions, implementation of those decisions, and evaluation of existing policies and programs. 1

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Making of United States International Economic Policy: Principles, Problems, and Proposals for Reform
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 308

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.