Trade, Industrialization, and Integration in Twentieth-Century Central America

By Irma Tirado de Alonso | Go to book overview
16.
To obtain these results, contact the authors at the Department of Economics and Finance, University of New Orlean, New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S.A. The detailed information appears in Appendix Tables I through 5 which contain the following information for each of the five countries: Table 1: Trade Creation and Partner's Output Gain
Trade creation based on total imports.
A value, calculated in a similar manner as the traditional trade creation, that indicates the increased propensity to import relative to the base year.
Output effect for each CACM trading partner attributable to trade creation.
Table 2: Trade Diversion and Partner's Output Gain
Trade diversion based on imports from the rest of the world, with separate columns for the ROW without Honduras (CACM-5) and ROW including Honduras (CACM-4). The latter was used by Cline and Delgado to study terminal years after the departure of Honduras.
Output effect for each CACM trading partner attributable to trade diversion.
Table 3: Net Trade and Net Partner's Output Gain
Net trade creation for CACM 5 and for CACM 4 calculated as the difference TC minus TD. The values in this table are the result of calculations that include the negative values that suggest trade suppression and trade augmentation.
The net output effects from both trade creation and trade diversion calculated as the sum of the values indicated in Tables A and B. As with the net trade creation estimate, these calculations include the negative values.
Table 4: Partner's Share of CACM Trade
The relative share of the imports that the CACM trading partners provide in each year.
Table 5: Imports, Exports, GDP and Consumption
The actual statistics for the members used in the analysis, including intraregional and total imports, total exports, GDP, and calculated total consumption.
17.
Between 1973 and 1982, the cost of imported goods and transportation was increasing, and there were loans readily available for developing nations to fund investments. These conditions would be conducive to increased augmentation.
18.
Given the aggregate nature of the analysis, the specific attention to changes in tariffs incorporated by Cline and Delgado was not possible.

REFERENCES

Balassa Bela. ( 1965). Economic Development and Integration. Mexico City: Centro de Estudios Monetarios Latinoamericanos.

Brada Josef C. and Jose A. Mendez. ( 1988). "An Estimate of theDynamic Effects of Economies Integration." Review of Economics and Statistics, (February): 163-68.

Bulmer-Thomas Victor. ( 1988). Studies in the Economics of Central America. London: Macmillan.

Cline William R. and Enrique Delgado. ( 1978). (Eds.). Economic Integration in Central America. New York: Brookings Institution.

Corden W. M. ( 1976). "Custom Union Theory and the Nonuniformity of Tariffs." Journal of International Economics,( June): 99-106.

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Trade, Industrialization, and Integration in Twentieth-Century Central America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface xi
  • PART I INTRODUCTION 1
  • 1: CENTRAL AMERICA: THE CHALLENGES OF TRADE, INDUSTRIALIZATION, and INTEGRATION IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY 3
  • 2: A MACROECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF CENTRAL AMERICA 15
  • SUMMARY AND OVERVIEW 36
  • Note 36
  • PART II TRADE IN CENTRAL AMERICA 39
  • 3: THE STRUCTURE OF TRADE IN CENTRAL AMERICA 41
  • SUMMARY 58
  • Notes 59
  • References 59
  • 4: IDUSTRIALIZATION and TRADE IN CENTRAL AMERICA 61
  • Notes 85
  • References 85
  • 5: MEXICO AS A POTENTIAL MARKET FOR CENTRAL AMERICAN and CARIBBEAN PRODUCTS 87
  • Notes 98
  • PART III INDUSTRIALIZATION AND INTEGRATION IN CENTRAL AMERICA 101
  • 6: THE INTENSITY OF CENTRAL AMERICAN ECONOMIC INTEGRATION 103
  • CONCLUSIONS 111
  • Notes 113
  • Notes 114
  • 7: ASSEMBLY OPERATIONS IN CENTRAL AMERICA 117
  • References 149
  • 8: PANAMA: ECONOMIC INTEGRATION ALTERNATIVES, IMPLICATIONS, and PERSPECTIVES 153
  • Notes 178
  • References 179
  • 9: THE CENTRAL AMERICAN COMMON MARKET: AN ANALYSIS Of WELFARE EFFECTS FROM 1970 TO 1984 183
  • Conclusion 202
  • Notes 203
  • Notes 204
  • PART IV SPECIAL ISSUES 207
  • 10: ECONOMIC PROSPECTS FOR CENTRAL AMERICA IN THE DECADE OF THE 1990S 209
  • Notes 220
  • REFFERENCES 220
  • 11: A REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICIES and STRATEGIES FOR TRADE and INDUSTRIALIZATION IN CENTRAL AMERICA 223
  • CONCLUSION: WHERE TO FROM HERE? 232
  • References 235
  • 12: THE DILEMMA OF EXPORT RIVIVAL: NICARAGUAN AGRICULTURE AT A TURNING POINT 237
  • Notes 251
  • References 251
  • 13: CHALLENGES and PROSPECTS FOR CENTRAL AMERICA IN A GLOBAL TRADE CONTEXT 253
  • BIBLIOGRAPHICAL ESSAY 271
  • SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY 277
  • Index 279
  • ABOUT THE CONTRIBUTORS 289
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