Franklin D. Roosevelt's Rhetorical Presidency

By Halford R. Ryan | Go to book overview

Preface

This book is not about President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's life, nor is it a history of his New Deal. However, these matters are within the scope of the book as it discusses how FDR addressed the American people in order to persuade them to accept him and his political agenda from 1933 to 1945. The focus is on the rhetorical relationship between Roosevelt and the national audience.

The progression of chapters in this book is probably not what one usually expects in a work on Roosevelt, but they were ordered purposefully. Chapter I argues that FDR was a prototypical rhetorical president. That is, he delivered programmatic speeches and Fireside Chats to move the people to elect and support him, and to persuade the public to move the Congress to adopt his legislative agenda. He practiced the tenets of the rhetorical presidency and usually excelled in all of them. However, there were occasions when he did not succeed as he would have wished, as in the purge and Court fight. These instances, too, are worth investigating for their own intrinsic merit and for the purposes of demonstrating how certain tenets should not have been abused and how they could have been practiced better.

Chapter 2 treats his speech delivery. Roosevelt's delivery has not been given the credit it deserves in his persuasive practices. The fact is that his audiences saw him speaking in person, heard him on the radio, watched him on the newsreels, and read his speeches in the newspapers. Except for in the print media, FDR communicated his thoughts to audiences by combining the artistry of his words with the artifice of his skills in speech delivery. This chapter makes the focused argument that his delivery was a potent factor in his rhetorical presidency.

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Franklin D. Roosevelt's Rhetorical Presidency
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 210

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.