The National Government and Social Welfare: What Should Be the Federal Role?

By John E. Hansan; Robert Morris | Go to book overview

Chapter 4
Reviving an Affirmative Concept of Corporate Duty: The Public Corporation

Howard Schweber

One of the persistent themes in discussions of American industrial policy and future economic development is the role of corporations in the nation's economic life. America's political economy is built around a philosophy that identifies the private sector as the engine of prosperity, a conception that has taken serious hits in recent years as a result of evidence that corporations' search for profit at times contradicts the idea of playing a role in securing the nation's economic health. Emphasis on immediate profit, much heralded by shareholders and corporate raiders in the 1980s, has been blamed for American industry's failure to create an economic infrastructure capable of supporting long-term national growth. Particularly when compared with the Japanese or Western European patterns, it appears that American industry is driven by short-term thinking.

Unconstrained by guiding principles imposed under a national industrial policy and lacking an internal motivation for long-term planning, it seems that time and again in the last thirty years, American industry's aggressive pursuit of immediate profit has resulted in gypped consumers, unprotected workers, and local and even regional economies held hostage to the whims or speculations of twenty-five-year-old MBAs (Masters of Business Administration). There is a feeling of betrayal in the realization that the private sector, intended in the American myth to be the engine of progress, has instead become a source of uncertainty and economic peril. The degree of rage that this issue has aroused is most evident in the negative emotions that are focused on the class most blamed for the conduct of modern business: the much-despised Yuppies.

-43-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The National Government and Social Welfare: What Should Be the Federal Role?
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 202

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.