Social Learning: Psychological and Biological Perspectives

By Thomas R. Zentall; Bennett G. Galef Jr. | Go to book overview
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studies. As many of the chapters in the present volume make clear, those opportunities are beginning to be exploited and a data base is in process of development that should greatly expand our understanding of social learning in animals.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Preparation of this chapter was greatly facilitated by grants from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the McMaster University Research Board. I thank Tom Zentall, Antoinette Dyer, and Mertice Clark for their useful comments on earlier drafts.


REFERENCES

Armstrong E. A. ( 1951). "The nature and function of animal mimesis". Bulletin of Animal Behaviour, 9. 46-48.

Baptista L. F., & Perrinovich L. ( 1984). "Social interaction, sensitive phases, and the song template hypothesis in the White-crowned sparrow". Animal Behaviour, 32, 172-181.

Bayroff A. G., and Lard K. E. ( 1944). "Experimental social behavior of animals: III. Imitational learning of white rats". Journal of Comparative and Physiological Psychology, 51. 327-333.

Berger S. M. ( 1962). "Conditioning through vicarious instigation". Psychological Review, 69, 450-466.

Berry C. S. ( 1906). "The imitative tendency of white rats". Journal of Comparative Neurology, 16, 333-361.

Berry C. S. ( 1908). "An experimental study of imitation in cats". Journal of Comparative Neurology, 18, 1-26.

Bonner J. T. ( 1980). The evolution of culture in animals. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Box H. O. ( 1984). Primate behavior and social ecology. London: Chapman & Hall.

Campbell B. A., & Raskin L. A. ( 1978). "The ontogeny of behavioral arousal: Role of environmental stimuli". Journal of Comparative and Physiological Psychology, 92, 176- 184.

Chesler P. ( 1969). "Maternal influence in learning by observation in kittens". Science, 166, 901-903.

Church R. M. ( 1959). "Emotional reaction of rats to the pain of others". Journal of Comparative and Physiological Psychology, 52, 132-134.

Church R. M. ( 1968). "Applications of behavior theory to social psychology". In E. C. Simmel , R. A. Hoppe, & G. D. Milton (Eds.), Social facilitation and imitative behavior. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Church R. M. ( 1957). "Two procedures for the establishment of imitative behavior". Journal of Comparative and Physiological Psychology, 50, 315-318.

Clayton D. A. ( 1978). "Socially facilitated behavior". Quarterly Review, of Biology, 53, 373- 391.

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