Judgment and Decision Making: Neo-Brunswikian and Process-Tracing Approaches

By Peter Juslin; Henry Montgomery | Go to book overview

Chapter 11
Attitudes, Values, and Opinions: Models and Dynamics

Lennart Sjöberg
Stockholm School of Economics

It is commonly assumed in attitude research that attitudes are causally related to beliefs and values. In this chapter, I suggest that a different type of psychological dynamics is involved, and that the seemingly good fit often obtained by expectation models of attitude is due to the existence of a common component in attitudes, values, and beliefs: an underlying image. The image dynamics is revealed in belief-value correlations, which measure thought constraints; high belief-value correlations, often observed, show that beliefs and values are frequently not independent. Three studies will be presented. In Study 1, imagery data are shown to be related to attitude and to belief-value correlations. In Study 2, the concept of negative beliefs, called for in Fishbein scaling, is pursued and psychologically explained. In Study 3, the concept of salient beliefs is challenged. It is found that improbable properties also add importantly to the explanation of attitudes. The chapter is concluded with a discussion of consequences for attitude formation models.

Fishbein and Ajzen ( 1975) gave an exhaustive overview of the field of attitude measurement. They pointed out that all the traditional measurement methods could be conceptualized in the same manner in the sense that they required participants to indicate agreement or disagreement with statements about belief-value combinations of the type "Object X has the property Y." The property Y needs to have value implications, of course. Thus, all attitude measurement calls for observing to what extent people attribute value to the attitude object, to what extent they find it good or

-219-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Judgment and Decision Making: Neo-Brunswikian and Process-Tracing Approaches
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 346

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.