Dolphin Cognition and Behavior: A Comparative Approach

By Ronald J. Schusterman; Jeanette A. Thomas et al. | Go to book overview

practical line of research would be to make simultaneous comparisons of the naturally occurring brain structures of related species and of the computational models required to simulate their cognitive abilities. Either example makes the same point. Cognitive science is not irrelevant to biological science; it is complementary.

The complementarity is needed. This essay will have been more than a success if it contributes to only one experiment in which computational analyses are applied to the very real question of animal intelligence.


ACKNOWLEDGMENT

The preparation of this paper was supported by the Office of Naval Research, Contract N00014-80-C-0631. The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily endorsed by the Office of Naval Research or the Department of the Navy. I am happy to acknowledge helpful discussions with Michael Beecher and Elizabeth Loftus, and comments on the paper by Nina DeLange and Colene McKee. Naturally, the views expressed are my own and do not represent the opinions of my colleagues or, of course, of the Office of Naval Research.


REFERENCES

Anderson J. R. ( 1983). The architecture of cognition. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Anderson J. A. ( 1977). Neural models with cognitive implications. In D. La D. Berge, & S. Samuels (Eds.), Basic Processes in Reading: Perception and Comprehension Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Berry J. ( 1981). Cultural systems and cognitive sytles. In M. P. Friedman, J. P. Das, & N. O'Connor (Eds.), Intelligence and learning. New York: Plenum Press.

Binet A., & Simon T. ( 1905). "The development of intelligence in children". L'annee Psychologique, 12, 163-244.

Boring E. C. ( 1923). Intelligence as the tests test it. The New Republic, June 6, 35-37.

Carroll J. B. ( 1982). The measurement of intelligence. In R. J. Sternberg (Ed.). Handbook of human intelligence. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Coltheart M. ( 1984, July). Cognitive neuropsychology. Paper read at Attention and Performance Conference, Eugene, OR.

Conrad R. ( 1963). Acoustic confusions and memory span for words. Nature, 197, 1029-1030.

Cooper L., & Shepard R. ( 1973). Chronometric studies of the rotation of mental images. In W. Chase (Ed.), Visual information processing. New York: Academic Press.

Cover T., & Hart P. ( 1967). Nearest neighbor pattern classification. IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, IT-3, 21-27.

Fodor J. ( 1983). Modularity of the mind. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Garcia J. ( 1974). In Hankins W. G., & Rusiniak K. W. "Behavioral regulation of the mileu interne in rat and man." Science, 185, 824-831.

Griffin D. R. "The question of animal awareness." ( 1976) Rockefeller University Press.

Grossberg S. B. ( 1980). "How does the brain build a cognitive code?" Psychology Review 87, 1-51.

Henley N. ( 1969). "A psychological study of the semantics of animal tears". Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 8, 176-184.

-204-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dolphin Cognition and Behavior: A Comparative Approach
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 394

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.