Dolphin Cognition and Behavior: A Comparative Approach

By Ronald J. Schusterman; Jeanette A. Thomas et al. | Go to book overview

14 Acquisition of Anomalous Communicatory Systems: Implications for Studies on Interspecies Communication

Irene M. Pepperberg
Northwestern University

Humans have long been fascinated by the possibility of interspecies communication. Their interest generally has centered on three groups of animals: great apes, certain marine mammals (dolphins and sea lions), and mimetic birds. Recently, this interest has engendered serious scientific inquiry, and studies designed to explore animal/human communication have been undertaken in several laboratoties. Although techniques vary, all such projects employ a common approach: the human researchers endeavor to impose the constraints of anthropocentric communicative systems onto the animals' natural behaviors. Animal subjects in experimental laboratories have thus been taught the use of either human codes or artificial forms of communication based on rules presumed to underlie human systems (see Gardner & Gardner, 1978; Herman, 1980; Herman, Richards, & Woltz, 1984; Miles, 1983; Patterson, 1978; Pepperberg, 1979, 1981, 1983; Premack, 1976; Savage- Rumbaugh, Rumbaugh, & Boysen, 1980; Schusterman & Krieger, 1984). Despite, and possibly because of, the widespread use of this methodology, questions consistently arise as to: (1) the validity and implications of this approach; (2) how the desired communicative behaviors may most efficiently be inculcated; and (3) what the consequences and significance of results might be with respect to the broad concepts of cognition and communication.


INCULCATION OF HUMAN CODES--VALIDITY AND IMPLICATIONS

A question immediately arises as to the validity of the premise which underlies much of this work: that animals possess cognitive abilities and exhibit complex communicative codes intended for information transfer upon which researchers

-289-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dolphin Cognition and Behavior: A Comparative Approach
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 394

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.