Children with Handicaps: A Review of Behavioral Research

By Gershon Berkson | Go to book overview

5
Sensorimotor Processes

We have now reached the end of the first part of this book. Up to this point, we have discussed history, causes, classification, and diagnosis in a general way. The overall point has been that, through a democratic ideology and scientific study, our understanding of disorders of development has become more refined, and treatment programs have become more active and increasingly informed by the facts.

We now turn to a more detailed consideration of the nature of handicapping conditions by a review of various individual and social processes. In five chapters, current concepts about sensorimotor processes; attention, learning, and memory; thinking, play, and communication; motivation, personality, and psychopathology; and social relationships are reviewed. In all of these chapters, emphasis is placed on normal, as well as abnormal, development, and examples from the various types of handicap discussed in chapter 2 are used to show that all people share the same basic processes.

In this chapter, we deal with sensation and perception, brain organization, and motor organization. There is always a danger in oversimplifying basic sensorimotor processes. The idea that sensations are converted to responses in a linear series of steps is, perhaps, a convenient way of thinking about these processes. However, the situation is actually much more complex. Many processes can occur simultaneously. Sensations are part of an ongoing transaction between the children and the environment around them. Some sensory input affects the child's behavior, whereas most does not. Readiness states, motivation, and learning history are only a few of the determinants of which sensations do and do not affect the child.

-129-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Children with Handicaps: A Review of Behavioral Research
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • I - General Issues 1
  • 1 - Introduction 3
  • 2 - Categories and Prevalence 41
  • 3 - Causes of Developmental Disorders 69
  • 4 - Identification and Diagnosis 105
  • II - Individual Psychology 127
  • 5 - Sensorimotor Processes 129
  • 6 - Attention, Learning, and Memory 149
  • 7 - Intelligence, Play, and Language 173
  • 8 - Motivation and Personality 205
  • III - Social Psychology 229
  • 9 - Social Interactions 231
  • 10 - Educational Programs and Treatment Methods 269
  • 11 - Life in Adulthood 314
  • References 337
  • Author Index 439
  • Subject Index 475
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 479

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.