Technology in Education: Looking toward 2020

By Raymond S. Nickerson; Philip P. Zodhiates | Go to book overview

8 Intelligent Machines for Intelligent People: Cognitive Theory and the Future of Computer-Assisted Learning

LAUREN B. RESNICK ANN JOHNSON University of Pittsburgh

In this chapter we consider some current and potential efforts in computer- assisted learning in light of major themes from cognitive learning theory. Some of the themes reflect established principles of human cognition and learning: others are currently active domains of questioning and theoretical development. In each case we consider the implications of cognitive principles for the develop. ment of computer-based instruction, as well as the consequences of these developments for theories of learning. The review and evaluation of programs offered here reflect an admittedly optimistic perspective on the technological advances made in recent years. Computers are altering the landscape of our social and intellectual environment, and they are undoubtedly here to stay. The promise for new approaches to human learning that capitalize on the capacities of "intelligent machines" seems great. Nevertheless, we conclude by raising questions about the current dominant view of the role of computers in education and suggesting that a broader conception of the ways in which machines might enhance human intelligence is needed.

The chapter can best be characterized as a smorgasbord reflecting the state of the field, organized around themes that are shared by and central to an branches of cognitive science. Our instructional examples are drawn quite opportunistically. Some derive explicitly from cognitive theory; others are built on the intuitions of artful instructors in various teaching disciplines. In many cases the design and building of computer-based instructional systems provide the occasion for fundamental theoretical examination. Most of the programs discussed here are as much laboratories for research on learning and instruction as they are programs for immediate instructional use. Continued corabora

-139-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Technology in Education: Looking toward 2020
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 334

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.