The Good Soldier: A Tale of Passion

By Ford Madox Ford; Thomas C. Moser | Go to book overview

VI

MY coming on the scene certainly calmed things down--for the whole fortnight that intervened between my arrival and the girl's departure. I don't mean to say that the endless talking did not go on at night or that Leonora did not send me out with the girl and, in the interval, give Edward a hell of a time. Having discovered what he wanted --that the girl should go five thousand miles away and love him steadfastly as people do in sentimental novels, she was determined to smash that aspiration. And she repeated to Edward in every possible tone that the girl did not love him; that the girl detested him for his brutality, his overbearingness, his drinking habits. She pointed out that Edward, in the girl's eyes, was already pledged three or four deep. He was pledged to Leonora herself, to Mrs. Basil and to the memories of Maisie Maidan and of Florence. Edward never said anything.

Did the girl love Edward, or didn't she? I don't know. At that time I daresay she didn't, though she certainly had done so before Leonora had got to work upon his reputation. She certainly had loved him for what I will call the public side of his record--for his good soldiering, for his saving lives at sea, for the excellent landlord that he was and the good sportsman. But it is quite possible that all those things

-280-

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The Good Soldier: A Tale of Passion
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Contents v
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS vi
  • Introduction vii
  • NOTE ON THE TEXT xxviii
  • SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY xxxvii
  • CHRONOLOGY OF FORD MADOX FORD xl
  • DEDICATORY LETTER TO STELLA FORD 1
  • Title Page 5
  • I 7
  • II 17
  • III 27
  • IV 42
  • V 56
  • VI 80
  • PART II 89
  • I 91
  • II 114
  • PART III 121
  • I 123
  • II 145
  • III 158
  • IV 177
  • V 192
  • PART IV 211
  • II 227
  • III 250
  • IV 262
  • V 268
  • VI 280
  • EXPLANATORY NOTES 295
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