P. G. T. Beauregard: Napoleon in Gray

By T. Harry Williams | Go to book overview

Index
Adams, Dan, 263-64
Aiken, William, 199
Ammonia Thermo-Specific Propelling Company, 287
Anderson, Robert, 8, 53, 54; and Fort Sumter, 54-58; surrenders Fort Sumter, 58-61
Appomattox River, 207, 220
Argentina, seeks Beauregard's services, 265-66
Atalaya, 20-21
Ayotla, 23
Aztec Club, 32
Barataria Bay, 9
Barnard, John G., 14, 30, 36-37, 44- 45, 50
Battery Gregg, 187; evacuation of, 194
Battery Wagner, 187; Federal attacks on, in 1963, 188-89, 193-94; evacuation of, 194
Beauregard, Armand, brother of P. G. T. Beauregard, 198
Beauregard, Caroline Deslonde, second wife of P. G. T. Beauregard, 35-36; death of, 203-205
Beauregard, Henri, son of P. G. T. Beauregard, 10, 323-24, 326, 328
Beauregard, Jacques Toutant-, see Toutant-Beauregard, Jacques
Beauregard, Laure Villeré, daughter of P. G. T. Beauregard, 36; marriage of, to Charles Larendon, 324; death of, 324-25
Beauregard, Marie Laure Villeré, first wife of P. G. T. Beauregard, 10; death of, 35-36
Beauregard, P. G. T., summary of career of, 1-2; birth and early life of, 3-5; education of, 5; goes to West Point, 5-8; esteems Napoleon, 5, 19, 39, 74-75, 93; accepts commission and first assignment, 8-9; at Fort Adams, Miss., 9; at Pensacola, 9; at Barataria Bay, 9; and mouths of Mississippi River, 9, 36- 37, 288-89; first marriage of, 10; homes of, 10, 322; at Fort Mc Henry, 10-11; quarrels with J. C. Henshaw, 11-12; desires war with Mexico, 12-13; in Mexican War, 13-33; as engineer officer with Scott, 15; in siege of Vera Cruz, 15-19; irked at Scott, 19, 22, 33; at Cerro Gordo, 19-22; at Puebla, 23; scouts roads to Mexico City, 24-25; at the Pedregal, 25-27; scouts approaches to Mexico City, 27-28; at Piedad council, 28-30; at Chapultepec, 30; in capture of Mexico City, 31-32; in occupation of Mexico City, 32-33; assigned after Mexican War, 34-36; supports Franklin Pierce in elections of 1852, 38-39; and New Orleans customhouse, 39-41, 45; threatens to resign from army, 42-43; runs for mayor of New Orleans, 43-44; and superintendency of West Point, 44- 46; resigns from army, 47; applies for service in Confederate army, 48; assigned to command at Charleston, 49-50; description of, 51-53; assumes command in Charleston, 53-56; demands surrender of Fort Sumter, 56-58; directs attack on Fort Sumter, 58-61; as first Confederate hero, 61-62; confers with Davis in Montgomery,

-339-

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P. G. T. Beauregard: Napoleon in Gray
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Illustrations xiii
  • Maps xiii
  • Chapter One - The Creole 1
  • Chapter Two - The Halls of Montezuma 13
  • Chapter Three 34
  • Chapter F Our - The Guns of Sumter 51
  • Chapter Five - Napoleonic Planning at Manassas 66
  • Chapter Seven - Pity for Those in High Authority 96
  • Chapter Eight - With Albert Sidney Johnston 113
  • Chapter Nine - Shiloh 133
  • Chapter Ten 150
  • Chapter Eleven - Return to Charleston 166
  • Chapter Twelve - The Big Bombardment 185
  • Chapter Thirteen - Return to Virginia 197
  • Chapter Fourteen - On The Petersburg Line 212
  • Chapter Fifteen - Commander of the West 236
  • Chapter Sixteen - Reconstruction 257
  • Chapter Seventeen - Painting the Monkey's Tail 273
  • Chapter Eighteen - The Louisiana Lottery 291
  • Chapter Nineteen - Ghosts and Ghostwriters 304
  • Chapter Twenty - Death of a Hero 319
  • Critical Essay on Authorities 330
  • Index 339
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