The Political World of American Zionism

By Samuel Halperin | Go to book overview

preface

Israel today stpnds as testimony to the power of a visionary idea and the force of a compelling need. About this idea, Zionism, and the events leading to the fulfillment of its political program, much has already been written; but the role of the United States, and especially of the American Jewish community, in the birth of Israel has been either ignored or grossly underplayed.

In a time when the nation's press customarily refers to American Jewry as "almost solidly pro-Israel if not actually Zionist," it is important to examine the genesis of this development in American Jewish public opinion. For American Jewry was not always pro- Israel. Hardly a generation has passed since major American Jewish organizations and leaders blocked the road to Jewish statehood and waged a militant struggle against fellow Jews in the Zionist movement. This fading of opposition and the consequent growth of Zionist influence are the focus for this study of public opinion formation and political action.

My work could not have been undertaken except for the truly impressive scholarship of a host of historians and social scientists. No less valuable were the bountiful writings of numerous Zionist officers, a publication achievement which must rank high in the annals of American social action movements. To all these men and women my debt is profound. Other than acknowledge it here, I can do no more than append a bibliography demonstrating the wealth and diversity of materials awaiting those who would look to our country's many subgroups for a view in microcosm of the American political process.

Those who have labored with me in this study are many. But for the cogent suggestions of Drs. Salo W. Baron, Harold Basilius, William N. Chambers, Abraham G. Duker, Lloyd P. Gartner, Irving Halperin, Ralph K. Huitt, Merle Kling, Robert H. Salisbury, and Mrs. Barbara C. Woodward, I express my particular gratitude, as I do to the helpful staffs of the Zionist Archives and Library in New York and of the Central Zionist Archives in Jerusalem. Thanks are

-v-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Political World of American Zionism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 436

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.