The Political World of American Zionism

By Samuel Halperin | Go to book overview

8
ideology or philanthropy? the politics of zionist fund-raising

In 1930, organized American Zionism stood on the brink of complete collapse. Leaders and followers alike had generally ceased talking of the near-term prospects for a sovereign Jewish state. As a worldwide political movement, Zionism no longer quested immediately for statehood; Palestine was instead to be developed gradually. Far from being the "potent political lobby" described by many journalists a decade later, Zionism was largely a fund-raising movement dedicated to the economic reclamation and colonization of Palestine. In the words of one contemporary wag, a Zionist was a person who schnorred (begged) money from a second person in order to send a third person to Palestine. But even in this regard, Zionist success was feeble at best. Hampered by a crippling organizational deficit, the Great Depression, and a membership that had fallen to less than one-fourth of the 1918 high of 200,000, Zionist remissions to Palestine averaged only $1,000,000 annually.

Little over a decade later, however, memberships in the American Zionist movement rose to almost 600,000 while funds raised for Palestine exceeded $100,000,000 per year. Drawing upon a public of only 5,000,000 persons, organized Zionist fund-raising in America far surpassed the drives of such well-established national philanthropies as the American Red Cross and the American Cancer Society. Indeed, it may not be an exaggeration to suggest that, measured by fund-raising, American Zionism was the most successful political interest group in our nation's history.

This chapter concentrates on a vital yet scarcely-studied dimension of interest group politics: the techniques of financing political action. Specifically, it "tests" an hypothesis implicit in many studies

-189-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Political World of American Zionism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 436

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.