Letters of Hartley Coleridge

By Grace Griggs Evelyn; Earl Griggs Leslie et al. | Go to book overview

And now to say a Word by Way of Moral
As I would gladly win the Laurel
My Tale shews that Cowards fear not more the brave Man's Eye
Than brave Men loath the Cowards Cry.

And now my dear Uncle to my Mother Brother and Sister to my two dear Friends to my Aunts and to Edith and Herbert give my Love. Remember me to be your affectionate Nephew--

HARTLEY COLERIDGE.

Like all children, Hartley attempted to reproduce in an imaginary way all that he heard and saw; and by far the most interesting of his creations was his invention of Ejuxria. That politics and religion were in large measure a part of his dreamworld was only to be expected; for no one living with Coleridge, Southey, and Wordsworth could escape such topics. Little Hartley heard and wondered. He pretended that at a future time a small cataract would break forth in the fields near Greta Hall, and he named the stream Jug-Force. Soon he founded a people to live along the banks; then he extended the region, until it became a separate world, an island-continent, where he reproduced all that he knew of the real world, and to which he gave the name Ejuxria. He was familiar with the political difficulties of his imaginary country, and he loved to weave his fancies into a story. 'Stamping about the room,' Hartley dictated to his mother, 'with all the importance of an unfledged authorling,' a History of St. Malo, an enthusiastic Reformer and Hierophant, the scene of which is laid in Ejuxria, but beyond the fragment in the following letter, the manuscript does not seem to be extant. The letter, which is addressed to Miss Barker, is in the handwriting of Hartley's mother, who has added a postcript.


LETTER 2
To MISS BARKER

Keswick, April 10, 1808.

My dear Miss Barker

I have a wild story, the history of an Ejuxrian, which I am sure is not worth sending, yet as you wished to have it, nonsense and all, I send it, but dear Miss Barker, pray do not shew it to any body till I can do something better.

The history of Saint Malo--

Augurias Malo was born in a village near Nolo, in the Southern part of the kingdom of Maza. From childhood he

-5-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Letters of Hartley Coleridge
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 330

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.